Land & Gender

land and gender

To achieve the Sustainable Development Goals and promote gender equity in access to land, laws, institutions, and customary practices that are gender discriminatory need to be addressed.

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
Global

By Professor Jeffrey Sachs, Chairman of the Advisory Board of CCSI, University Professor at Columbia University, and Director of the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network

Global

By Jamal Browne

Since the adoption of the global indicator framework by the UN Statistical Commission (UNSC) back in March 2016, significant progress has been made on a set of tenure-related indicators – familiarly referred to as the ‘land indicators’ – primarily through the efforts of the Global Land Indicators Initiative (GLII).


Closed
24 April 2017 to 12 May 2017
Facilitators
Joana Rocha Dias
Henrique Pires dos Santos
Mozambique
Angola
Sao Tome and Principe
Cape Verde
Guinea-Bissau
Brazil
Timor-Leste
Portugal
CPLP countries

 

women.jpg
19 October 2017
Africa

Date : 18 octobre 2017

Source : Agence Ecofin

ONU Femmes, l’entité des Nations Unies pour l’autonomisation des femmes et l’égalité des genres, a profité de la célébration de la Journée internationale de la femme rurale, ce 15 octobre 2017, pour rappeler les inégalités dont sont victimes les femmes dans l’accès aux terres agricoles, particulièrement dans les pays en développement.

18 October 2017
Global

The International day of Rural Women, which we celebrate today, is an annual event to recognise the role women play in agriculture and rural development.

In Kenya where the foundation of most communities is agriculture and livestock production, women contribute up to 80 per cent of workforce yet they only hold 1 per cent of registered land in their names and around 5-6 per cent of registered titles are held in joint names (Kenya Land Alliance, 2013).

Training Resources & Tools
January 2010
Uganda

Property rights economically empower women by creating opportunities for earning income, securing their place in the community and ensuring their livelihoods. When women are economically empowered, it spurs development for their families and communities. Property Rights and Gender in Uganda: A Training Toolkit seeks to strengthen understanding of property rights for women and men as equal citizens.

Policy Papers & Briefs
October 1992
Uganda

In the developed countries less than 20 per cent of the population is engaged in agriculture. The rest is employed in the industrial sector. In the underdeveloped countries less than 10 per cent of the population is employed in the industrial sector and the rest is engaged in agriculture. At once this dictates that, for some time to come, the route to development in the latter countries will depend on agriculture, which also mainly depends on land policy and tenure. The land question is a contradiction in land rights and consequential social, economic and political abuses replicated on it.

Reports & Research
July 2008
Uganda

Land is a natural resource that is limited and finite but with immense commercial (as an asset and factor of production), social-cultural, spiritual and aesthetic value. On the other hand, a family particularly in the context of Uganda is a fluid social construct deriving its strict definition from a particular social-cultural context. Land and family conflicts have been shown by various studies 1 to be the most prevalent form of livelihoods disruption to many households’ and individuals.