Namati: Innovations in Legal Empowerment

Namati is an international organization that tests the potential of legal empowerment through innovative interventions and research. Through our work, we seek a better understanding of the impacts of legal empowerment and the most effective mechanisms for achieving them. 

As a means of cultivating a more robust movement for legal empowerment, Namati also hosts a growing Global Legal Empowerment Network of practitioners and supporters. Network members are active in every continent in the world, whereas Namati’s programs and research focus on exploring the potential of legal empowerment in specific countries, including Sierra Leone, India, Liberia, Mozambique, and Uganda.

Mission: Building a movement of grassroots legal advocates

Namati Resources

Displaying 1 - 7 of 7
Journal Articles & Books
December 2016
Mozambique

Despite expanding policy commitments in many poor countries, health care is often a failure at the point of delivery. Lack of information, poor enforcement, and power dynamics prevent those whose rights have been violated from pursuing redress. In Mozambique, grassroots health advocates work to address this gap between policy and reality by blending approaches known as legal empowerment and social accountability.

Journal Articles & Books
February 2016
Southern Africa

In 2013, a group of 20 expert advocates from across Africa gathered for a three-day symposium to share experiences and practical strategies for effectively supporting communities to protect their lands and natural resources. The symposium illuminated many similarities between the types of threats to communities’ land and natural resource claims, as well as underlying factors that drive and exacerbate the threats.

Journal Articles & Books
January 2015
Mozambique

Under Mozambique’s Constitution and Land Law (1997), communities may legally govern their lands and natural resources according to customary norms and practices, so long as local customs do not contradict national law. However, rising land scarcity and associated increases in land value are leading some families to “reinterpret” custom as sanctioning the dispossession of widows from their marital lands.

Reports & Research
December 2014
Mozambique

Mozambique currently has one of the highest rates of land concessions throughout Africa. In the coming years, if large-scale land concession grants to private investors are not carefully controlled, the amount of land still held and managed by rural Mozambicans will decrease significantly, with associated negative impacts on already impoverished rural communities.

Reports & Research
October 2013
Mozambique

O presente Relatório descreve a forma como o projecto Pro-Terras Comunitárias foi implementado. Em particular, o projecto descreve as causas da realização desta pesquisa, a metodologia usada, analisa os dados obtidos e produz recomendações sobre como melhor proteger os direitos das comunidades e dos grupos vulneráveis. Este projecto foi implementado em 20 comunidades dos distritos de Jangamo, Homoine e Morrumbene, localizados na província de Inhambane e teve a duração de 18 meses.

 

Peer-reviewed publication
April 2013
Mozambique

In international debates about land governance, Mozambique is often mentioned as an example of a country with favorable framework for local communities to benefit from landbased investments. However, it is also one of the countries highlighted in land grab debates for being one of the top countries where foreign companies and national elites are acquiring large extensions of land. It is increasingly clear that in spite of the favorable legal framework and pro-poor policies, local communities are under stress.

Peer-reviewed publication
December 2009
Mozambique

Rural Communities have their own sets of laws rooted in their particular culture, environment, traditions and history that are separate from national laws. Lack of education, years of wartime political oppression and violence, and government-enforced cooperative ventures during the 1970’s have created a deep feeling of suspicion among rural small-scale farmers for all government laws and programs. This
conception has been reinforced by the fact that historically communities have only been made aware of