Land News

Even waste water shouldn’t be wasted

Friday, March 17, 2017

 

It is not just an ecological imperative, it opens up business opportunities as well. Market mechanisms need to improve

On March 22, we will celebrate the 24th World Water Day. The theme this year is ‘Waste Water’. This day is generally observed to spread awareness among the general public and focus on its importance in sustainable development.

Water Recycling: How mountain women are using waste water to convert taro leaves into manure

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

 

The taro leaf prevents seepage and holds water for more days.

Somewhere in a mountain village in the Himalayas, a woman folds a taro leaf into a cone, fills it with soil, and sows a seed. She waters her little cone with waste water from the kitchen, creating an enabling environment for the seed to germinate in, says a woman researcher of an international institute.

World Water Day: Learn to preserve every drop as two-thirds of humanity are haunted by its scarcity

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

 

Thomas Fuller's words "We never know the worth of water till the well is dry" ring true, when reports coming in from across the world paint a picture of despair regarding depleting water resources.

22 March has been observed as World Water Day since it was first proposed in Agenda 21 of the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development in Rio de Janeiro. The UN had designated the day as International World Water Day in 1992 at the same conference.

Waste water management – The role of industries

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

 

Since the inception of World Water Day 24 years ago to advocate for the sustainable management of water resources, several stakeholders have come together across the world each year to increase the awareness among people about the importance, need and conservation of water.

The focus this year, 2017 is waste water.

Ghana pushes for economic empowerment of women in cocoa industry

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

 

Ghana has made a strong case at the United Nations for the economic empowerment of women in the cocoa industry.

At an event on the sidelines of the on-going 61st Session of the Commission on Status of Women (CSW) at the UN Headquarters in New York, it became clear that gender inequalities limit economic productivity, efficiency and undermines the development agenda.

Despite murderous attacks, Tanzania's 'witches' fight for land

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

 

NYASHANA, Tanzania (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - As Tanzanian widow Ruth Zacharia raised her right arm to protect her skull from a volley of machete blows, her three attackers sliced through her hand.

She fell to the floor; one leg slid into the kitchen fire.

"They said: 'We have been sent by our mother because you killed our father so that you could buy that land'," the 63-year-old recalled, fidgeting with her stiff, scarred right hand.

"I said: 'I am not a witch'... They started cutting me all over."

Seeking research and data consultant for TI's Africa Land and Corruption Programme

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Application Closing Date - 02 Apr 2017
Job Start Date - April 2017 to July 2017
Duration - 3 months
Location - Remote

Transparency International (TI) is the global civil society organisation leading the fight against corruption. Through more than 100 chapters worldwide and an international secretariat in Berlin, Germany, TI raises awareness of the damaging effects of corruption and works with partners in government, business and civil society to develop and implement effective measures to tackle it.

Amazon’s indigenous call for open dialogue with extractive industry leaders

Monday, March 20, 2017

 

Indigenous rights leaders from a Catholic Church network traveled to Washington, D.C., to highlight human rights violations against people in the Amazon and to call for prior consultation with extractive industries pursing projects on their lands.

Pan-Amazonian Church Network Vice President Pedro Barreto Jimeno told Humanosphere that Friday’s hearing was the first time Amazonian people were the primary focus of a human rights hearing at the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights in Washington, D.C.