Rwanda

RWA

Rwanda

Rwanda is a small country and landlocked. It covers an area of 26,338 km². In Rwanda, land is an important issue due to two different characteristics: first is that Rwanda is one of the most densely populated countries in the world (416 people per km2 – (NISR, 2012). Being an agricultural country, where over 85% of its working class citizens depend on agriculture, adds more pressure on land as the sole economic capital to the rural peasants [1].

The country has had a considerable number of displacements caused by ethnic tensions both in 1959 and 1994 [2]. These displacements disrupted the relationships people had with their land and resulted in secondary occupation and successive legitimate land claims in the post conflict Rwanda [3].

In the post-conflict Rwanda, there are enormous land claims resulting from the effects of the displacements and legitimized secondary occupation. The Rwandan government thus realized that developing a long-term solution to these problems required new interest-based and right-based procedures, which not only help solve the land claims issues but also act as a catalyst for future reconciliation. As a result, these two different but related policies were adopted: land sharing and the vllagisation programme (grouped or nuclear settlement) commonly known as Imidugudu settlement.

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Land Governance Assessment Framework (LGAF)

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    Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure

    Legend: National laws adoption of the VGGT principle
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    Note: The Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries, and Forests in the Context of National Food Security (The VGGTs) were endorsed by the Committee on World Food Security in 2012.

    The "VGGT indicators" dataset has been created by Nicholas K. Tagliarino, PhD Candidate at the University of Groningen, with support from Daniel Babare and Myat Noe (LLB Students, University of Groningen). The indicators assess national laws in 50 countries across Asia, Africa, and Latin America against international standards on expropriation, compensation, and resettlement as established by Section 16 of the VGGTs.

    Each indicator relates to a principle established in section 16 of the VGGTs. Hold the mouse against the small "i" button above for a more detailed explanation of the indicator.

    Answering the questions posed by these indicators entails analyzing a broad range of national-level laws, including national constitutions, land acquisition acts, land acts, community land acts, agricultural land acts, land use regulations, and some court decisions.

    Media

    Latest News

    2 August 2017
    Rwanda

    Land Portal Foundation Rwanda Country Portfolio provides comprehensive understanding of post-conflict land governance

     

    With tumultuous colonial occupation, civil war and genocide that led to the death of an estimated 500,000 to 1,000,000 Tutsis in 1994, Rwandans historically endured massive displacements and human rights abuse. Thus, in the 21st century, the rectification of Rwanda’s previously untenable land governance system has become a major priority.

    31 March 2017
    Global
    Ethiopia
    Kenya
    Rwanda

     

    its4land is an EU-financed project to assist Kenya, Rwanda and Ethiopia in mapping land tenure more quickly, cheaply and transparently. It will end in three years’ time; right now, the Africans and Europeans are in the phase of needs assessment. The focus is not on technical requirements, but on operational priorities and managerial context. The first results indicate that low-cost geospatial technologies will be helpful, not least because they also benefit priorities other than improving cadastral services.

    3 April 2017
    Rwanda

     

    Authorities Threaten, Prosecute Residents Who Speak Out

     

    (Nairobi) – Military and civilian authorities in western Rwanda have arrested, beaten, or threatened people who challenged recent government decisions to force residents off their land, Human Rights Watch said today.

    Africa
    Rwanda
    Tanzania

    By: Jean d'Amour Mbonyinshuti
    Date: October 12th 2016
    Source: AllAfrica.com / The New Times

    Rwandan rural women, together with their counterparts from various countries on the continent, will today convene at the foot of Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania in an effort to advocate for unrestricted women's rights to land and other natural resources across the continent.

    Latest Blog

    Rwanda

    By Sarah Logan and Mallory Baxter

    African cities are rapidly expanding as the number of urban residents rises due to rural-urban migration and population growth. Ad hoc urban expansion contributes to an increase in unplanned settlements, urban poverty and inequality, and constraints on new residents, who are attempting to secure access to adequate housing, property rights, employment, and basic services.

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