Land, Climate change & Environment

Climate change & Environment

Environment, as a cross-cutting issue, addresses global challenges of environmental impact related to land use, land management and land tenure, including the issues surrounding climate change and natural resource management.

Environmental and land tenure challenges include the following:

  • landlessness that drives poor urban and rural people to occupy and misuse fragile ecosystems;
  • tenure insecurity undermining investment incentives and leading to environmental mismanagement in urban as well as in rural areas;
  • large scale land acquisitions and investments may lead to tenure insecurity of poor and vulnerable groups and environmental damages;
  • encroachment in particularly vulnerable and valuable habitats;
  • increasing threats in coastal areas due to sea water rise and severe weather risk;
  • shortage of arable and liveable lands results to more disputes and conflicts;
  • increasing tensions between land, land tenure arrangements and land use;
  • increasing land fragmentation in densely populated areas;
  • deforestation and forest degradation leading to carbon emissions and loss of biodiversity.

Source: GLTN

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
Global

By Professor Jeffrey Sachs, Chairman of the Advisory Board of CCSI, University Professor at Columbia University, and Director of the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network

Closed
24 April 2017 to 12 May 2017
Facilitators
Joana Rocha Dias
Henrique Pires dos Santos
Mozambique
Angola
Sao Tome and Principe
Cape Verde
Guinea-Bissau
Brazil
Timor-Leste
Portugal
CPLP countries

 

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Angola
Brazil
Cape Verde
CPLP countries
Equatorial Guinea
Guinea-Bissau
Mozambique
Portugal
Sao Tome and Principe
Timor-Leste

 

Anúncio 1.2

 

Reports & Research
March 2017
Mozambique
Uganda
Ghana
Senegal

Access to land is at the heart of rural livelihoods. In sub-Saharan Africa, the pace and scale at which land is changing hands are increasing fast. Understanding these changes in land access is crucial if the systems of land governance, the practices of companies and organisations, and the initiatives seeking to influence rural development, are to adapt and have a positive impact.

Policy Papers & Briefs
January 2017
Uganda

The ways in which people obtain land in Uganda are changing fast. Land that used to be secured through inheritance, gifts or proof of long-term occupancy is now more commonly changing hands in the market. Those with wealth and powerful connections are frequently able to override local rules and gain access to land at the expense of poorer individuals. Government-backed agribusiness investors receive large areas of land with benefits for some local farmers who are able to participate in the schemes, while other smallholders see their land access and livelihoods degraded.

Reports & Research
July 2008
Uganda

Land is a natural resource that is limited and finite but with immense commercial (as an asset and factor of production), social-cultural, spiritual and aesthetic value. On the other hand, a family particularly in the context of Uganda is a fluid social construct deriving its strict definition from a particular social-cultural context. Land and family conflicts have been shown by various studies 1 to be the most prevalent form of livelihoods disruption to many households’ and individuals.

Reports & Research
April 2012
Uganda

This report investigates cases of land grabbing in Uganda, focusing in particular on oil palm plantations in Kalangala, Lake Victoria. It assesses the impacts on rural communities and on the local environment, and questions who benefits from these projects.

Reports & Research
August 2010
Uganda

Tenure in Mystery collates information on land under conservation, forestry and mining in the Karamoja region. Whereas significant changes in the status of land tenure took place with the Parliamentary approval for degazettement of approximately 54% of the land area under wildlife conservation in 2002, little else happened to deliver this update to the beneficiary communities in the region. Instead enclaves of information emerged within the elite and political leadership, by means of which personal interests and rewards were being secured and protected.

Reports & Research
September 2011
Uganda

London-based New Forests Company (NFC) would seem to be the design blueprint of how a young modern company should conduct a major land investment in Africa in a responsible way. Oxfam’s investigations reveal that serious allegations by people who were evicted from land to make way for NFC’s operations remain unresolved. How will the company respond?

Journal Articles & Books
January 2007
Uganda

Increasingly, social capital, defined as shared norms, trust, and the horizontal and vertical social networks that facilitate coordination and cooperation for mutually beneficial collective action, is seen as an important asset upon which people rely to manage natural resources and resolve conflicts. This paper uses empirical data from households and community surveys and case studies, to examine the role, strengths, and limits of social capital in managing conflicts over the use and management of natural resources.