Vietnam

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VNM

The Political Economy of Land Governance in Lao PDR

This country level analysis addresses land governance in Laos in two ways. First, it summarises what the existing body of knowledge tells us about power and configurations that shape access to and exclusion from land, particularly among smallholders, the rural poor, ethnic minorities and women. Second, it draws upon existing literature and expert assessment to provide a preliminary analysis of the openings for and obstacles to land governance reform afforded by the political economic structures and dynamics in the country.

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November 2015

The Neoliberal Agricultural Modernization Model: A Fundamental Cause for Large-Scale Land Acquisition and Counter Land Reform Policies in the Mekong Region

This conference paper examines how the ideology and programmatic set of policies coined in the term ‘neoliberal modernization’ applies to agriculture and practices in the Mekong region.

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May 2015

The Political Economy of Land Governance in Viet Nam

This country level analysis addresses land governance in Viet Nam in two ways. First, it summarises what the existing body of knowledge tells us about power and configurations that shape access to and exclusion from land, particularly among smallholders, the rural poor, ethnic minorities and women. Second, it draws upon existing literature and expert assessment to provide a preliminary analysis of the openings for and obstacles to land governance reform afforded by the political economic structures and dynamics in the country.

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April 2016

Integrated Watershed Management – an approach with a number of stumbling-blocks

Integrated Watershed Management represents an option for the management of water catchment areas. However, what may sound good in theory often proves to be very difficult when it comes to practical implementation, as an example from the Lower Mekong Region shows.

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June 2014

Genealogies of the Political Forest and Customary Rights in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Thailand

ABSTRACTED FROM INTRODUCTION: How have national and state governments the world over come to “own” huge expanses of territory under the rubric of “national forest,” “national parks”, or “wastelands”? The two contradictory statements in the above epigraph illustrate that not all colonial administrators agreed that forests should be taken away from local people and “protected” by the state. The assumption of state authority over forests is based on a relatively recent convergence of historical circumstances.

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December 2001

The context of REDD+ in Vietnam: Drivers, agents and institutions

PUBLISHER'S ABSTRACT: This report discusses the political, economic and social opportunities and constraints that will influence the design and implementation of REDD+ in Vietnam.

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December 2012