Thailand

ISO3: 
THA
Legislation
June 1937

For the purpose of the present Act “public property” means property of the King which is used exclusively for the benefit of the State, e.g. palace; “Crown property” means property of the King other than the King’s private property and public property. Section 4bis establishes the “Crown Property Bureau” to perform duties listed under Section 5. Section 4ter establishes that there shall be a “Crown Property Board”. The text consists of 9 sections.

Legislation
January 2004

For the purpose of the present Act “land re-adjustment” means the implementation of development of many plots of land by land replotting, improving or constructing infrastructure, and jointly bearing the burdens and equitably distributing the returns. To this end, there shall be above all cooperation between the private sector and the public sector, with the objective of utilizing land more appropriately with regard to transportations, economics, social, the environment and communities, and so as to be in line with urban planning.

Legislation
February 2015

In this Act “land consolidation” means the complete development of all plots of agricultural land to increase production and reduce production cost by consolidating several plots of land in the same area to reorganize the lands, arrange irrigation system, construct roads or transportation routes on farms, level the ground, nourish the soil, plan the production and distribution of agricultural produce. There shall be a committee called the "Central Land Consolidation Committee " composed of ministers and Government officers.

Legislation
May 1999

The purpose of the Act is to enact an act to support a long-term hire of immovable property. The Act prescribes the rights under a contract of hire as real right in the interest of the transfer of the rights of hire, devolution of an estate, and subletting which shall enhance the hire of immovable property for use in the commercial or industrial business in the long term.A lease of a land which has an area exceeding 100 rai shall require the approval of the Director-General in accordance with the rules, procedures and conditions prescribed in the Ministerial Regulations.

Regulations
January 2002

The present Regulation is made under section 15 of the Act on Land Code Declaration. In particular, the Regulation lays down provisions relating to procedures of acquisition of land in Thailand on behalf of aliens. Clause 2 establishes that such a land must be located in a certain area round Bangkog as specified in this clause. The text consists of 9 clauses.

Implements: Act promulgating the Land Code B.E. 2497. (2008)

Reports & Research
December 2016

Across the Mekong region, ‘development’ has become synonymous with rapid economic growth, to be achieved through predominantly large-scale, private investments. The development model promoted by the region’s governments prioritizes trade and investment liberalization, and privatization. Private investment is sought in virtually every sector of the economy from energy, oil, minerals, agriculture and food processing to education, health, tourism, manufacturing, pharmaceuticals, transportation and urban infrastructure. 

3 April 2017

The Regional Center for Social Science and Sustainable Development and the Mekong Land Research Forum will run a week-long intensive summer school on land research in the Mekong Region. The purpose of the summer school is to equip early-career academic and advocacy-oriented researchers with key concepts, access to existing research outputs, and knowledge of current land issues across the region in order to strengthen individual and networked research that is geared towards secure access to land amongst the region’s rural and urban poor.

Reports & Research
April 2017

This dialogue provided a way for the land community to collaboratively explore challenges and opportunities related to the recognition of indigenous, ethnic minority and customary tenure rights in the Mekong region in order to:

27 March 2017

 

Thailand is aiming to increase its domestic palm oil production by up to 50 per cent over the next nine years while at the same time trying to reclaim encroached peat forest from smallholders.

“Look, the peat here is so deep” 61-year-old Preecha Chimtong, a smallholder farmer growing oil palm on his 49-rai (about 20-acre) farm in southern Thailand’s Chumphon province.

The land is spongy underfoot, dark black and sodden, and Chimtong takes one of the metal tools used to pick up the oil palm bunches and easily pushes it deep into the ground to demonstrate.