Tanzania

ISO3
TZA
Conference Papers & Reports
March 2017

Administration of land in Tanzania is more decentralized from the president to the village level. The law gives power to village councils and village assemblies to administer village land. The District authorities are given advisory and supervisory mandates over villages and represent the commissioner who takes overall administrative powers.  Despite decentralization, institutions responsible for land administration, land have continued to be cause of many conflicts for years.  Conflicts have been escalating and lead loss of lives and property.

Conference Papers & Reports
March 2017

This preliminary study involved consultation of responsible district government officials and relevant Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) on various issues related to land and investments. Among other areas, the Southern Agricultural Growth Corridor of Tanzania (SAGCOT) was selected as a study site and study used the Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) to obtain information. Questionnaire designed reflected land investment  governance  process  thematic  areas.

Reports & Research
October 2011

TNRF, UCRT and Maliasili Initiatives have published, From Promise to Performance?: Wildlife Mangement Areas in Northern Tanzania.  The summary provides an overview of findings of two studies recently carried out by TNRF on the current status and performance of three WMAs in northern Tanzania, in Arusha and Manyara regions 

Policy Papers & Briefs
November 2011

Climate change and its implications on development in Tanzania should not be understated or ignored. Instead, discussions on our changing climate should begin with the recognition that climate change is undermining efforts to eradicate poverty. Yet, scientific complexities, jargon, uncertainties and debate have led to a general lack of understanding and confusion on how to address a changing climate, including policy prescriptions.

Reports & Research
March 2012

The purpose of this assignment was to establish whether there is appetite to hold a public debate on how to realise better land‐based investments in Tanzania. It also aimed at identifying what would be the discussion issues and most appropriate mechanism to allow different actors from different levels to articulate their perspectives on land‐based investments in Tanzania. This has been triggered by the sensitivity surrounding the topic.

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Reports & Research
September 2014

Planning for climate resilience growth is increasingly important for the natural resource dependent economy of Tanzania. Central government does not have the knowledge, reach, skills or resources needed to plan for the range of livelihoods within Tanzania; but local governments, if granted the authority and resources, could plan with communities in the flexible, timely and appropriate manner that climate variability demands.

Cover page
Conference Papers & Reports
March 2017

Land is one of the terrains of struggle for most rural women in Africa because of its importance in sustaining rural livelihoods, and social-cultural and geopolitical factors that hinder women from enjoying land rights. Even when there are progressive land laws, as it is for Tanzania, women have not really enjoyed their rights. However, this has not stopped women to keep fighting for their land rights.  They have sought their own approaches by leveraging opportunities within traditional, religious, and formal systems standing for their rights. 

Front cover
Reports & Research
December 2016

Training volunteers to help their communities defend their land rights has proved an effective approach for promoting land justice in Tanzania. This report documents how Hakiardhi, a Dar-es-Salaam based research institute working on land governance issues, has established and trained a 600-strong network of male and female ‘Land Rights Monitors’ (LRMs) operating in 300 villages on various aspects of the land law, so they can help people and local governments to exercise and ensure respect for their legal rights in land disputes.

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Reports & Research
October 2017

This study assessed the contribution of Geita Gold Mine (GGM) to the livelihoods of local communities in Geita District. Specifically, it assessed the effectiveness of corporate social responsibility implementation, determined the extent to which GGM has contributed to socio-economic development in the study area, and examined the communities’ perceptions of environmental problems associated with mining activities and their impact on community well-being. A cross-sectional research design was employed, in which qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection were used.