Rwanda

RWA
2 August 2017
Rwanda

Land Portal Foundation Rwanda Country Portfolio provides comprehensive understanding of post-conflict land governance

 

With tumultuous colonial occupation, civil war and genocide that led to the death of an estimated 500,000 to 1,000,000 Tutsis in 1994, Rwandans historically endured massive displacements and human rights abuse. Thus, in the 21st century, the rectification of Rwanda’s previously untenable land governance system has become a major priority.

DSC_0439.jpg
4 August 2017
Rwanda

Date : 1er août 2017

Source : Agence News Press

Par : KT Press

Grâce aux nouvelles technologies, il est actuellement possible au Rwanda, d’acheter un terrain et d’entreprendre toutes les démarches administratives en vue de l’obtention d’un titre foncier, et ceci en seulement 3 jours. Auparavant, pour finaliser le transfert foncier, il fallait compter au minimum trente jours.

Reports & Research
December 2003
Rwanda

There have been major shifts/changes in land use patterns in Rwanda over the past twelve years. A few striking observations include: As a percentage of total farmland, cultivated land increased. The increase in cultivated land occurred at the expense of pasture and fallow and woodlot. The share of pasture and fallow decreased from 22% in 1990 to 14% in 2002 and woodlot decreased from 11% in 1990 to 7% in 2002. This trend of increasing cultivated land is apparent from the mid-eighties to today.

Journal Articles & Books
December 1995
Rwanda
Africa

Despite its importance in agricultural development, the oft-observed inverse relationship between farm size and land productivity in developing countries has received very limited attention in Africa. This work tries to fill the gap by analyzing the relationship between farm-size and
productivity in Rwanda.

Reports & Research
December 2003
Rwanda

There have been major shifts/changes in land use patterns in Rwanda over the past twelve years. A few striking observations include: As a percentage of total farmland, cultivated land increased. The increase in cultivated land occurred at the expense of pasture and fallow and woodlot. The share of pasture and fallow decreased from 22% in 1990 to 14% in 2002 and woodlot decreased from 11% in 1990 to 7% in 2002. This trend of increasing cultivated land is apparent from the mid-eighties to today.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2015
Rwanda
Equatorial Guinea
Cameroon

SUMMARYSemi-structured interviews were used to explore how rural communities near forests are responding to environmental change in three African nations — Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea and Rwanda. The study first recounts people's perception of environmental change — what are the issues of greatest concern identified by local communities? Second, it explores people's responses to identified environmental problems and in particular the role of forests in these processes.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2006
Rwanda

Sustainable land use planning involves both policy- and farmer-oriented agricultural land use strategies. In this paper, a spatially and temporally explicit multi-scale decision support system that reveals the biophysical indicators affecting land use choices of these different stakeholders, is explained and demonstrated. It comprises three different environmental assessment tools, designed to run with data supplied by traditional soil surveys and organised into a land resources information system.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2013
Rwanda

Apart from the difficulty to attract new members, leakage of sales outside the cooperative is a major challenge for the coffee cooperatives in Rwanda. Local (independent) traders still constitute a major market for coffee producers. Yet, cooperatives also accept the produce from non-members and pay them the same price. Our objective in this paper is to analyse the importance of this phenomenon of double side-selling. We collected data from a sample of 170 coffee farmers. We use a probit model to analyse characteristics linked to cooperative membership and to study double side-selling.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2006
Rwanda

A decade ago, Rwanda embarked on a major land reform programme. The government envisaged a new land law, supported by a land policy, and claimed that the new tenure system would contribute to enhancing food production, social equity and the prevention of conflict. The Land Law was finally passed in the summer of 2005. The UK Department for International Development (DFID) has taken on significant responsibility for monitoring the reform programme. This article provides a contextualized reading of the new Law.