Nepal

NPL
Reports & Research
October 2011
Bangladesh
Burkina Faso
Chad
Chile
Colombia
Ecuador
Ethiopia
Ghana
India
Kenya
Laos
Nepal
Peru
South Africa
Thailand
Vietnam
Zimbabwe
South-Eastern Asia
Eastern Africa
Southern Asia
Southern Africa
South America
Western Africa

Despite challenges in many river

basins, overall the planet has

enough water to meet the full range

of peoples’ and ecosystems’ needs

for the foreseeable future, but

equity will only be achieved through

judicious and creative management.

Conference Papers & Reports
December 2003
South Africa
Sri Lanka
Nepal
Thailand
Cambodia
Indonesia
Malaysia
Myanmar
Philippines
Vietnam
Asia
South-Eastern Asia
Reports & Research
December 2004
Nepal
Pakistan
Sri Lanka

The case studies reported here highlight important concepts and information on the linkages between water and poverty that may not be available elsewhere. The overall objective of the studies is to draw generic lessons and identify interventions that can help policy makers, planners and other stakeholders to develop actions that are effective in water resources management for the poor. All case studies focus on poor in South Asia, but all with differing geographic contexts or thematic focci. The first two papers are based on field surveys supplemented by literature reviews.

Conference Papers & Reports
December 2012
Nepal
Ghana
Asia
Southern Asia
Africa
Western Africa

Eco-toilets (human urine and faecal matter collected separately) are one of the best ways to solve sanitation problem, and this practice also improves the environment and increases the food production. This study focuses on experimental demonstration of use of urine, wood ash and poultry droppings (PD) as a fertilizer in central Nepal and in Accra, Ghana. In Nepal, Fertilizer value of urine+ash was compared with animal manure and no-fertilization in the cultivation of radish, potato, broadleaf mustard, auliflower and cabbage.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2001
Nepal

Most forests in tropical Nepal are secondary, resulting largely from episodes of large-scale timber harvesting in the past along with accumulated small scale extraction of timber and non-timber forest products by local people over centuries. Currently in the forest depleted stage, remaining tropical secondary forests are still very important for fulfilling the subsistence and economic needs of local people, as well as for biodiversity conservation, groundwater recharge, and the protection of lowland agriculture from landslides and floods.