Mongolia

MNG
Goats getting ready for milking in the Khovd Province of Mongolia. Photo credit: © Eddie Game / The Nature Conservancy
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By Yuta Masuda and Brian E. Robinson

I’m sitting in a Mongolian yurt, listening to and trying to emulate Bataa’s* songs about love for the grasslands and the wide, treeless plains of the Mongolian Plateau. Our host sings with consuming passion. I might have brushed his enthusiasm off as a show two weeks ago. But after living and working in these grasslands, the feeling of freedom that comes from unobstructed, far-off distant horizon is infectious.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2007
Mongolia

In Mongolia, overgrazing and mismanagement are considered to be the causes of soil erosion and land degradation. However, the field data available on soil erosion and land degradation processes are limited. Two experimental watersheds were selected within the Kherlen river basin in Mongolia to assess the state and cause of soil erosion; this was done by monitoring the water-sediment discharge in two small catchments with different vegetation covers. The two sites-Kherlenbayan-Ulaan (KBU; 6.9 ha) and Baganuur (BGN; 7.6 ha)-have relative heights of 100 m and 150 m, respectively.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2012
China
Mongolia
Eastern Asia

The Mongolian plateau in East Asia is part of a new hotspot of land cover change. Recent human activity and natural forces have degraded grasslands in northern China with the southern Mongolia steppe similarly vulnerable. Investigating vegetation patterns at piospheres (the area around water points) can identify herder influence on pasture conditions. Through fieldwork and remote sensing this paper examines plant density and species richness at water sources to establish land cover patterns in two Mongolian provinces where overgrazing is thought to be the major cause of degradation.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2015
Mongolia

In Mongolia, nomadic herders have successfully been grazing livestock for more than a millennium. However, in recent years, concerns have increased that changes in management and higher livestock stocking rates may negatively affect vegetation and increase soil erosion, overland flow and sediment load of rivers. In addition, ambitious agricultural policies increase the intensity of agricultural land use thus enforcing a conversion of grassland to agricultural land which is far more susceptible to erosion.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2006
Mongolia

Steppe desertification due to vehicle travel is a severe environmental issue in Mongolia. We studied natural vegetation recovery on abandoned vehicle tracks in the central Mongolia steppe through vegetation surveys and stable isotopic techniques. The following issues were addressed: (i) invasion of pioneering plant species, (ii) alteration of soil surface features, and (iii) contribution of revegetated plants to soil organic matter (SOM).

Journal Articles & Books
December 2013
Mongolia

The aim of this paper was to develop a simple assessment for precisely appraising the status and trends of desertification in Bayankhangai soum. The Bayankhangai soum is in central Mongolia, which is a part of the Hustai National Park, and this soum (administrative subdivision) belongs to the Orhon and Tuul river basins of the Khangai mountain region, encompassing 100,733 ha, and 7170 ha that is specially protected. The current study is more focused on methods for assessing climate change, pastureland change by herders and land degradation assessment.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2008
Mongolia

We focused on land units as landscape characteristics and selected seven typical land units on a land catena comprising two areas of southern Mongolia. Hierarchical analysis was used to test the hypothesis that a land unit's edaphic factors could explain the differences in vegetation responses to grazing.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2013
China
Mongolia

In order to understand the genetic diversity of wild Ussurian pears in China, chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) of 186 wild accessions from 12 populations in Inner Mongolia, Heilongjiang and Jilin Provinces and 51 Chinese and European pear cultivars including Pyrus ussuriensis, Pyrus pyrifolia, Pyrus bretschneideri, Pyrus sinkiangensis and Pyrus communis were investigated. Each accession was classified into one of three types (types A, B and C) based on two large deletions in the hypervariable regions between the accD–psaI and rps16–trnQ genes.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2011
Mongolia
Eastern Asia

Changing environmental and socio-economic conditions make land degradation, a major concern in Central and East Asia. Globally satellite imagery, particularly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data, has proved an effective tool for monitoring land cover change. This study examines 33 grassland water points using vegetation field studies and remote sensing techniques to track desertification on the Mongolian plateau.