India

IND
Nourishing millions: Stories of change in nutrition cover image
Peer-reviewed publication
Reports & Research
June 2016

Malnutrition costs the world trillions of dollars, but global commitment to improving people’s nutrition is on the rise, and so is our knowledge of how to do so. Over the past 50 years, understanding of nutrition has evolved beyond a narrow focus on hunger and famine. We now know that good nutrition depends not only on people’s access to a wide variety of foods, but also on the care they receive and the environment they live in. A number of countries and programs have exploited this new understanding to make enormous strides in nutrition.

India

By Madhu Sarin, Fellow of the Rights and Resources Initiative (RRI)

 

Q: What is required to strengthen women’s land and community forest rights in practice in India?

Land Conflicts in India cover image
Reports & Research
November 2016

Land and resource conflicts in India have deep implications for the wellbeing of the country's people, institutions, investments, and long-term development. These conflicts reveal deep structural flaws in the country's social, agrarian, and institutional structures, including ambiguities in property rights regimes and institutions.

Policy Papers & Briefs
December 2011

The complexity and magnitude of issues pertaining to land administration and management in Bangladesh cannot be overstated. The nature and volume of land disputes in the nation indicate the inefficiency of the land administration system and land dispute resolution mechanisms. Especially multiple claims to the same property-fuelled by the uncoordinated land recording systems-are widespread. land grabbing presents huge legal and governance related challenges.

25 June 2017
India

Tribespeople say individual ownership could lead to fragmentation of land

Edamalakudi’s Oorukkoottam — assembly of people in the tribal hamlet and officials — arrived at an unusual decision last month: no individual household in the panchayat would individually own forestland as guaranteed by the Forest Rights Act.

12 June 2017
India

The FRA sought to correct the historical injustice done to the traditional forest-dwelling communities by conferring rights to hold and own forest land where they traditionally lived and cultivated

Peer-reviewed publication
July 2013

Planned efforts to relocate human populations often entail protracted struggles over the terms on which local populations may be compensated for the loss of land, assets and livelihoods. In many instances, compensation has been established on the basis of historical market value, which in effect excludes stakeholders (e.g., encroachers, landless laborers, sharecroppers, etc.) whose livelihoods are adversely affected by land acquisition. Establishing ways of recognizing and compensating the loss of informal land and livelihood is therefore a pressing policy priority.