Guatemala

GTM
Reports & Research
Policy Papers & Briefs
December 2012
Guatemala
Latin America and the Caribbean

Doing business sheds light on how easy or difficult it is for a local entrepreneur to open and run a small to medium-size business when complying with relevant regulations. It measures and tracks changes in regulations affecting 10 areas in the life cycle of a business: starting a business, dealing with construction permits, getting electricity, registering property, getting credit, protecting investors, paying taxes, trading across borders, enforcing contracts and resolving insolvency.

Reports & Research
Training Resources & Tools
December 2016
Guatemala
Latin America and the Caribbean

This Systematic Country Diagnostic (SCD) looks at why a country with such great potential has not been able to materialize it. The SCD analysis has identified several knowledge gaps. The analysis in this report focuses on the 2000 to 2014 period, covering the boom years before 2008 and the global financial crisis and recovery years up to 2014. It is based on a rich household data set from the National Living Standards Measurement Survey (ENCOVI) as well as on data on malnutrition from the 2014 National Survey of Maternal and Child Indicators (ENSMI).

Reports & Research
December 2004
Guatemala
Latin America and the Caribbean

Poverty in Guatemala is high and deep. In 2000, over half of all Guatemalans lived in poverty. About 16 percent lived in extreme poverty. Available evidence suggests that poverty in Guatemala is higher than in other Central American countries. Although poverty has fallen over the past decade, its trend recently declined due to a series of economic shocks during 2001 and 2002. The drop of poverty incidence since 1990 is slightly slower than what would have been predicted given Guatemala's growth rates, suggesting that growth has not been particularly pro-poor.

Addressing Biodiversity-Social Conflict in Latin America

Project duration
January 2013 to January 2015
Project value
USD 1300000
Donors

The overall goal of the U.S. Government in providing technical support and training under the Addressing Biodiversity-Social Conflict in Latin America (ABC-LA) program is to improve indigenous/minority community and local/regional governmental capacities to better address conflicts (potential and on-going) in the extractives sector that may negatively impact areas of significant biodiversity, thus leading to greater inclusion of marginalized groups.

Guatemala

Por:Itzamná Ollantay

Los días 30 y 31 de agosto, del presente año, defensores y comunicadores indígenas y campesinos, provenientes de 14 pueblos mayas, Xinca y Mestizo, asentados en 122 comunidades, distribuidos en 17 departamentos del país, se autoconvocaron en el Encuentro Nacional de Defensor@s y Comunicador@s Comunitarios, realizado en el Cantón San Miguelito, Municipio Santo Domingo, Departamento de Suchitepéquez.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2014
Guatemala

Identifying the patterns of land cover change (LCC) and their main proximate causes and underlying driving forces in tropical rainforests is an urgent task for designing adequate management and conservation policies. The Lachuá region maintains the largest lowland rainforest remnant in Guatemala, but it has been highly deforested and fragmented during the last decades. This is the first paper to describe the patterns of LCC and the associated political and socioeconomic factors in the region over the last 50� years.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2015
Guatemala

Cloud forest in the Central Highlands of Guatemala provides important ecosystem services for the Q’eqchi’ Maya but has been disappearing at an increasing rate in recent decades. This research documents changes in cloud forest cover, explores some contributing factors to deforestation, and considers forest preservation and food security implications for Q’eqchi’ communities. We used a transdisciplinary framework that synthesized remote sensing/GIS analysis of land cover change, focus group dialogs, and surveys.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2012
Guatemala

The existing legal framework for water resources management in Guatemala is obsolete, inconsistent and not enforced. To bridge the gap, many indigenous and non-indigenous communities throughout the country successfully regulate water use through oral or written bylaws. This paper classifies the rules and practices adopted by local communities in order to define their scope and anticipate options to recognize customary water rights in future statutory legislation, as well as under the current legal regime, consistently with the public interest.