Eritrea

ERI
Reports & Research
October 2010
Eritrea
Eastern Africa

The project ‘Water Productivity Improvement of Cereals and Food Legumes in the Atbara Basin of Eritrea’ is an example of organization and implementation of farmers’ participatory research, conducted utilizing the available indigenous knowledge while empowering farming communities. Farmers have been partners in technology development with extension and research, with full decision-making power in planning, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2014
Senegal
Mauritania
Mali
Burkina Faso
Algeria
Niger
Nigeria
Chad
Sudan
South Sudan
Eritrea
Cameroon
Central African Republic
Ethiopia
Africa
Sub-Saharan Africa
Middle Africa
Eastern Africa
Northern Africa
Southern Africa
Western Africa

In Africa, where most agriculture is rainfed, crop growth is limited by water availability. Rainfall variability during a growing season generally translates into variability in crop production. While the seasonality of rainfall in the drier rangelands can play a significant role in productivity, rain-use efficiency (RUE)—the amount of biomass produced (in kilograms of dry matter per hectare) per millimeter of rainfall—also drives production.

Journal Articles & Books
July 2015
Senegal
Mauritania
Mali
Burkina Faso
Algeria
Niger
Nigeria
Chad
Sudan
South Sudan
Eritrea
Cameroon
Central African Republic
Ethiopia
Africa
Western Africa

Drought is one of the major climatic hazards impacting on the various sectors including crop and livestock in the West African Sahel. Pastoral and agro-pastoral communities in the region are regularly affected by drought, with vulnerability differing with gender, age, wealth status (access to cropland and livestock endowment), geographic location, social networks, and previous exposure to drought. Effective interventions require regular monitoring of vulnerability to drought, for which various quantitative and qualitative approaches exist.

March 2010
Eritrea
Ethiopia
Kenya
Sudan
Eastern Africa

This project is about showing whether RMSs are effective. It will seek to quantify the consequences of improved RMS for community livelihoods, resource productivity, land quality, and downstream water quality and siltation. It will specifically measure the downstream, cross-scale consequences of successful innovation in the Ethiopian highlands.

This project will develop methods to anticipate ex ante the likely consequences of introducing improved RMS as well as monitoring and measuring these consequences ex post. Finally, it will introduce methods for adaptive management.

July 2009
Ethiopia
Kenya
Eritrea
Sudan
Eastern Africa

This project is about matching technologies (or whole strategies) with environments. It has been shown that “blanket” RMS are often inappropriate. One size does not, as they say, fit all. Strategies for upper slopes are likely to be different than those for lower slopes.

Conference Papers & Reports
December 2011
Rwanda
Burundi
Ethiopia
Egypt
Sudan
Tanzania
Eritrea
Kenya
Uganda
Africa

Remote sensed imagery in combination with secondary agricultural statistic was used to map crop water productivity (WP) in the Nile River Basin. Land productivity and crop tandardized gross value production (SGVP) were calculated at administrative level using the agricultural census data. Actual evapotranspiration (Eta) generated from remote sensing was used to assess crops consumptive water use. WP was then calculated by dividing SGVP by Eta in the cropped areas. Results show land productivity has a huge variation across the basin.

Policy Papers & Briefs
December 2009
Eritrea
Ethiopia
Kenya
South Sudan
Sudan
Uganda
Africa
Eastern Africa

Livestock use and degrade much water in the Nile River Basin. New research suggests that integrated development and management of water and livestock resources will conserve water and increase the profitability and environmental sustainability of investments by governments, development agencies, and farmers.

Practical opportunities exist to enhance food security, reduce poverty, and foster benefit sharing. Institutions responsible for water resources may benefit from partnering with the livestock sector when developing water resources.

Reports & Research
December 2010
Bangladesh
Bhutan
Brazil
Burkina Faso
Cambodia
Chad
Chile
China
Colombia
Eritrea
Ethiopia
Ghana
Honduras
India
Iran
Kenya
Laos
Malawi
Mexico
Nepal
Niger
Nigeria
Pakistan
Peru
South Africa
Sudan
Thailand
Vietnam
Zimbabwe
Southern Africa
South America
Western Africa
Middle Africa
Eastern Africa
Central America
Western Asia
Northern Africa
Southern Asia
South-Eastern Asia

IN response to an on-line survey, 76 project leaders and staff gave CPWF Phase 1 a

generally favorable review. Respondents came from 68 CPWF projects in 45 countries on

three continents. The survey sought to help learn what went well in Phase 1, what did not

go so well and can be improved in Phase 2.

Nearly three-quarters of respondents felt that they had achieved different research results,

outcomes and impacts as a result of participation in the CPWF than otherwise possible from