Rangelands, Drylands & Pastoralism

Rangelands, Drylands & Pastoralism

Rangelands are grasslands, shrublands, woodlands, wetlands, and deserts that are grazed by domestic livestock or wild animals. Types of rangelands include tallgrass and shortgrass prairies, desert grasslands and shrublands, woodlands, savannas, chaparrals, steppes, and tundras.

Pastoralism is the branch of agriculture concerned with the raising of livestock. "Pastoralism" generally has a mobile aspect, moving the herds in search of fresh pasture and water (in contrast to pastoral farming, in which non-nomadic farmers grow crops and improve pastures for their livestock). 

 

Drylands conventionally are defined in terms of water stress: as terrestrial areas where the mean annual rainfall (including snow, fog, hail, etc) is lower than the total amount of water evaporated to the atmosphere.

Sources: GlobalRangelands.org & Wikipedia & IUCN  

Mokoro WOLTS Project

Women's Land Tenure Security (WOLTS) Project Update on IWD 2017

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

To celebrate International Women’s Day, Mokoro is pleased to share news of the successful completion of fieldwork in the fourth of six phases of our WOLTS pilot study in both Mongolia and Tanzania. WOLTS is a major multi-country strategic action-oriented research project in support of the land rights of women and vulnerable groups. The WOLTS team is well underway with preparing two major reports of our country research findings, to be launched, respectively, in May and June this year.

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Rencontre avec Pierre Bitoun autour de l'ouvrage "Le sacrifice des paysans, une catastrophe sociale et anthropologique"

14 March 2017

Location

Fondation Charles Léopold Mayer
38 rue Saint Sabin, 75011
Paris
France
FR

Source : Agter.asso 

AGTER vous invite à une rencontre avec Pierre Bitoun autour de son dernier ouvrage coécrit avec Yves Dupont : "Le sacrifice des paysans ; une catastrophe sociale et anthropologique" (Éditions L’échappée, 2016).

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Les populations autochtones sont essentielles en vue de protéger la faune et les moyens d’existence ruraux

Date: 3 mars 2017

Source: Fao.org

Par Fao

Les communautés locales ont besoin d’aide afin d’atténuer les conflits opposant les populations à la faune.

Il est essentiel d'impliquer activement les populations autochtones et les communautés locales dans les efforts visant à conserver la faune afin de maintenir la biodiversité et d'assurer la durabilité des moyens d'existence ruraux, a annoncé aujourd'hui la FAO à l'occasion de la Journée mondiale de la vie sauvage.

Local use agreements: contributing to decentralisation and democritisation?

Also available in

There is growing degradation in sylvo-pastoral lands that were originally under common property regimes, but over which the state now asserts ownership. User associations are being given the right to take charge of regulating how these areas are sustainably exploited by means of use agreements, and are proving an effective instrument in halting the degradation process.

Resource information

January 2008

The Horn of Africa: confl ict prevention through regional mechanisms

Also available in

The Horn of Africa is one of the most conflict-prone areas of the world. It is also home to about 20 million pastoralists, which keep moving with their livestock in search for grazing land and water points. Pastoral conflicts are becoming more and more serious. CEWARN - a regional mechanism for preventing conflicts - tries to close the gap between 'early warning' and 'early response'.

Resource information

January 2008

Rangelands –sound management strategies for a vulnerable resource

Also available in

Rangelands cover 30 per cent of the global land surface. They support a considerable share of the global ruminant value chains, are habitat for a high plant and animal diversity and have various ecological, economic and social functions. But rangelands are currently under pressure from global change processes. A focus on humananimal- environment interactions is necessary to avoid resource overexploitation and degradation.

Resource information

August 2013

Linking poor livestock keepers to markets

Also available in

The growing global demand for animal products also offers poor livestock keepers the opportunity to switch from the subsistence to the market economy. Our author gives an account of three approaches in the meat and dairy sector in Africa and Asia with their respective potentials and limitations – and also warns against possible negative effects.

Resource information

November 2014

Pastoralism and conflict – two sides of a coin?

Also available in

Pastoralism – the predominant form of livestock keeping in the Horn of Africa – has always been a source of disputes and tensions in the region. So it is maybe no coincidence that precisely those countries with the largest cattle and camel herds should be the ones that have been suffering from prolonged armed conflict for years. This article takes a look at the closely interwoven aspects influencing conflicts in the Horn of Africa in general and South Sudan more specifically.

Resource information

November 2014

Pasture management in Central Asia – regional learning for reform

Also available in

The former Soviet Central Asian republics have undergone de-intensification of their livestock sectors, resulting in an increased reliance on natural pastures. Property rights systems are key to the sustainable management of this resource. However, as the authors demonstrate, it is not easy to implement the respective reform processes.

Resource information

November 2014

Livestock: recyclers that promote the sustainability of smallholder farms

Also available in

Livestock are kept for a wide range of purposes in Africa, and there is considerable diversity in animal husbandry. Among the most important advantages in keeping animals is their contribution to maintaining and even improving soil fertility. Furthermore, animal husbandry offers economic, social and cultural benefits. However, the authors also look at the constraints that smallholders face in livestock husbandry.

Resource information

November 2014