Land Stakeholders & Institutions

Land Stakeholders & Institutions

A stakeholder is anyone or any institution who has interests in, or is affected by, an issue or activity or transaction, and therefore has a natural right to participate in decisions relating to it. 

There may be more than one stakeholder, or stakeholder group, claiming an interest in the land use on a particular area of land.

As examples, a farmer is a stakeholder in relation to the distribution or management of irrigation water from a common source, or as regards decisions on grazing rights on communal land. The term can also be applied to groups, as when several groups have an interest in, or are affected by, the exploitation of the water from a reservoir or products extracted from a forest. Stakeholders include those individuals or groups, such as women or indigenous communities, who have genuine and legitimate claims on use, but whose opinion may not be valued in current negotiations for cultural or religious reasons. Groups resident outside the area, such as non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and research institutions, can also be stakeholders. Also the government of a country may have ministries with the position of stakeholders. The concept can be extended to include unborn generations who have a future interest in the resource.

Source: FAO

18 October 2017
Canada

Pipeline company downplaying major legal and financial risks of crossing unceded First Nations territory in British Columbia

18 October 2017
Australia

The pioneers of the Aboriginal land rights movement in the Kimberley are working off a faded photograph to try to identify people who took part in the Noonkanbah land rights protests, which galvanised Indigenous resistance in the region almost 40 years ago.

The iconic image was taken in 1978 and shows dozens of Aboriginal people marching across the dusty paddocks of Noonkanbah Station, in protest against plans by American company AMEX to drill for oil near sacred sites.

UN-Habitat.png
16 October 2017
Democratic Republic of the Congo

Date : 13 octobre 2017

Source : Radio Okapi

République Démocratique du Congo

 

VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT N°028/2017

Titre du poste: Expert Foncier (2 postes)

Lieu d’affectation: Bunia et Goma

Durée: 1 an renouvelable

Type de contrat : Service Contract SB4  (SC8)

Date de clôture : 27 octobre 2017

A. Contexte

National Policies
March 2015
Uganda

The Uganda National Land Policy (NLP) Implementation Action Plan is a deliberate resolution by the Government of Uganda to address major challenges that have hindered the implementation of land reforms, thereby impeding the optimal utilisation of land for socio-economic development and transformation. Although successive post-independence governments have made numerous efforts to streamline land governance and reconfigure the role of land in national development, the majority of these efforts have failed to address underlying issues and have thus remained unimplemented to date.

Legislation
July 2017
Uganda

Compulsory acquisition is the power of government to acquire private rights in land for a public purpose, without the willing consent of its owner or occupant. This power is known by a variety of names depending on a country’s legal traditions, including eminent domain, expropriation, takings  and  compulsory purchase.

Policy Papers & Briefs
September 2017
Uganda

A constitutional amendment bill has been tabled before Parliament with the primary aim of overhauling the Constitutional Right to Protection from deprivation of property (Article 26).

Peer-reviewed publication
December 2007
Uganda

This guide has been written as an information resource for government officials, community leaders, humanitarian aid workers, judges, lawyers and others whose responsibilities include upholding land and property rights in Uganda. It outlines the main provisions of Uganda’s constitutional and legal framework and the protection these provide to property rights. It briefly outlines the historical background to existing land tenure relations, describes the constitutional provisions relating to land in the 1995 Constitution and sets out the main provisions of the Land Act 1998.

Peer-reviewed publication
January 2013
Uganda

In northern Uganda, common grazing lands are central to village life. While nominally used for grazing livestock, communities also depend on their grazing lands to collect basic household necessities such as fuel, water, food, building materials for their homes, and traditional medicines. Yet growing population density, increasing land scarcity, weak rule of law, and the 1998 Land Act’s legalization of a land market have created a situation of intense competition for land in northern Uganda.

Policy Papers & Briefs
August 2016
Uganda

Food security in Uganda relies mainly on access to land and security of tenure. Land governance is marked by the contradiction between relatively progressive legislation and only partial implementation. Institutions that have to deal with land administration and land disputes, such as customary authority systems, local government, and special courts for land justice, have weakened in the last years. Women’s position with respect to land and inheritance also remains weak, both legally and in practice, undermining their livelihoods and status in society.