Land Policy & Legislation

The regulatory framework for land administration, land information management, planning and building consists of laws, regulations, standards, norms, and administrative procedures relating to land development that seek to determine what developers, land-owners, communities and residents are entitled to do with and on that land. Unless specified, they should apply equally to all these groups, organisations or individuals seeking to acquire, develop or transfer urban and rural land. The regulatory framework determines also the rules, responsibilities and procedures regarding the collect and the processing of land information, and land administration.

Source: GLTN

 

Reports & Research
December 2010
Mozambique

This study examines the statutory recognition of customary land tenure in Botswana, Mozambique and Tanzania, which were chosen as case studies because of the diverse approaches to the issue they represent. Botswana's Tribal Land Act (1968) established a system of regional land boards and transferred the land administration and management powers of customary leaders to the boards, which originally included both customary leaders and state officials among their members.

Conference Papers & Reports
March 2017
Uganda

The need to establish the link between land tenure and food security is increasingly gaining currency as governments and development organizations refocus their effort towards assisting farmers to move away from subsistence farming to commercial agriculture. It is argued that given how land plays a crucial role in the livelihoods of most Africans, food security and poverty reduction cannot be achieved unless issues of access to land, security of tenure and the capacity to use land productively and in a sustainable manner are addressed.

Journal Articles & Books
January 2007
Uganda

Increasingly, social capital, defined as shared norms, trust, and the horizontal and vertical social networks that facilitate coordination and cooperation for mutually beneficial collective action, is seen as an important asset upon which people rely to manage natural resources and resolve conflicts. This paper uses empirical data from households and community surveys and case studies, to examine the role, strengths, and limits of social capital in managing conflicts over the use and management of natural resources.

Reports & Research
May 2014
Uganda

Unfolding analysis reveals two types of land disputes prevalent in postwar northern Uganda: cases that involve a legitimate cause of action and those that do not.1 Since mediation and alternative forms of dispute resolution rely on parties’ willingness to negotiate in good faith, cases featuring ‘bad faith’ and land grabbing—where powerful parties intentionally exploit another person’s vulnerability in order to illegally2 claim land—pose a serious challenge for local land dispute mediators. Such mediators must wrestle with whether and how to remain neutral in the face of injustice.

Reports & Research
May 2017
Uganda

The ways in which people obtain land in Uganda are changing fast. Land that used to be secured through inheritance, gifts or proof of long-term occupancy is now more commonly changing hands in the market. Those with wealth and powerful connections are frequently able to override local rules and gain access to land at the expense of poorer individuals. Government-backed agribusiness investors receive large areas of land with benefits for some local farmers who are able to participate in the schemes, while other smallholders see their land access and livelihoods degraded.

Reports & Research
July 2013
Uganda

The Uganda Law Reform Commission with support from the Justice Law and Order Sector undertook a study to review the laws of succession in Uganda.   The purpose of the study was to ensure among others that; the provisions of the laws of succession are in conformity with the 1995 Constitution of the Republic of Uganda, national laws and international and regional human rights standards and practices, are up to date with the changing socio‐ economic circumstances of Uganda, and that the law is accessible to the people and its implementation can be better realised.