Access to Land & Tenure Security

Land tenure is the relationship, whether legally or customarily defined, among people, as individuals or groups, with respect to land. (For convenience, "land" is used here to include other natural resources such as water and trees.) Land tenure is an institution, i.e., rules invented by societies to regulate behaviour. Rules of tenure define how property rights to land are to be allocated within societies. They define how access is granted to rights to use, control, and transfer land, as well as associated responsibilities and restraints. In simple terms, land tenure systems determine who can use what resources for how long, and under what conditions.

Land tenure is an important part of social, political and economic structures. It is multi-dimensional, bringing into play social, technical, economic, institutional, legal and political aspects that are often ignored but must be taken into account. Land tenure relationships may be well-defined and enforceable in a formal court of law or through customary structures in a community. Alternatively, they may be relatively poorly defined with ambiguities open to exploitation.

Source: GLTN

 

Journal Articles & Books
February 2015
Mozambique

ACES is a three-year (2014 -2017) research project that is being implemented in Mozambique with the main purpose being to contribute to poverty alleviation in Mozambique by co-producing new knowledge of the dynamic links between land use change, Ecosystem Services (ES) and the wellbeing of the rural poor and thereby meet the demand from policy makers and practitioners for ways to better manage Mozambique’s woodlands (Dewees et al. 2008; Wiggins et al. 2012).

Reports & Research
December 2014
Mozambique

Social Justice in Forestry – as a project of FGLG with funding from the EC – supported the Mozambique Forest Governance Learning Group (FGLG-Mozambique) from January 2009 to December 2013, building on a first phase of EC support from April 2005 to December 2008 and an even earlier phase of work funded by DFID that started in 2003-2004.

Reports & Research
August 2009
Mozambique

The implementation of the South–South REDD process was made achievable by those who assumed leadership roles (political and technical), facilitated the meetings and the logistics on the ground (especially the consultations and training) and acted as resources people. It would be impossible to name everyone, but in particular we would like to thank the Minister of Environment, Alcinda Abreu, and Vice-Minister, Ana Chichava, who provided the leadership and often challenged the technical experts.

Journal Articles & Books
January 2007
Uganda

Increasingly, social capital, defined as shared norms, trust, and the horizontal and vertical social networks that facilitate coordination and cooperation for mutually beneficial collective action, is seen as an important asset upon which people rely to manage natural resources and resolve conflicts. This paper uses empirical data from households and community surveys and case studies, to examine the role, strengths, and limits of social capital in managing conflicts over the use and management of natural resources.

Reports & Research
October 2017
Mozambique

This report is a product of a partnership between Terra Firma and the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED), contributing to a study of changing land access in sub-Saharan Africa supported by the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD).

Reports & Research
October 2016
Mozambique

China’s investment and trade in Africa’s natural resource sectors have significant implications for Africa’s forests. Many investments are in forest areas. Some directly engage in logging while others, such as mining, infrastructure and agribusiness, affect forests and rural livelihoods. This report provides an overview of trends, evidence and issues related to the impacts on forests of Chinese investments in four African countries: Cameroon, Democratic Republic of Congo, Mozambique and Uganda.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2016
Mozambique

The Testing REDD+ in the Beira Landscape Corridor of Mozambique initiative closed in December. Over nearly four years, a consortium of public academic and research institutions, NGOs and social enterprises, supported by the Government of Norway, has explored what drives deforestation and forest degradation. The programme trialled four interventions: to expand conservation agriculture, to make logging more sustainable, to harvest and use biomass energy more efficiently, and to promote sustainable production of an important non-timber product. We now know what works.

Reports & Research
May 2014
Uganda

Unfolding analysis reveals two types of land disputes prevalent in postwar northern Uganda: cases that involve a legitimate cause of action and those that do not.1 Since mediation and alternative forms of dispute resolution rely on parties’ willingness to negotiate in good faith, cases featuring ‘bad faith’ and land grabbing—where powerful parties intentionally exploit another person’s vulnerability in order to illegally2 claim land—pose a serious challenge for local land dispute mediators. Such mediators must wrestle with whether and how to remain neutral in the face of injustice.

Journal Articles & Books
January 2017
Mozambique

As mudanças no acesso e uso da terra em Moçambique estão a criar novas paisagens, geralmente às custas das populações pobres. Apesar de haver uma legislação progressista da terra, grupos de elite e interesses privados estão a consolidar as suas propriedades de terra, enquanto que os camponeses perdem as suas terras e o acesso a terrenos férteis fica cada vez mais difícil.

12 October 2017

Location

FAO Headquarters - Iraq Room Rome
Italy
IT
Global

Taking stock of progress and mapping future contributions from development actors

The Land Portal Foundation and the Global Land Tool Network (GLTN) are please to invite you to our side event at the Committee on Food Security (CFS) on October 12, 8:30AM - 10:00AM, IRAQ Room,  FAO Headquarters, Rome