Access to Land & Tenure Security

Land tenure is the relationship, whether legally or customarily defined, among people, as individuals or groups, with respect to land. (For convenience, "land" is used here to include other natural resources such as water and trees.) Land tenure is an institution, i.e., rules invented by societies to regulate behaviour. Rules of tenure define how property rights to land are to be allocated within societies. They define how access is granted to rights to use, control, and transfer land, as well as associated responsibilities and restraints. In simple terms, land tenure systems determine who can use what resources for how long, and under what conditions.

Land tenure is an important part of social, political and economic structures. It is multi-dimensional, bringing into play social, technical, economic, institutional, legal and political aspects that are often ignored but must be taken into account. Land tenure relationships may be well-defined and enforceable in a formal court of law or through customary structures in a community. Alternatively, they may be relatively poorly defined with ambiguities open to exploitation.

Source: GLTN

 

Journal Articles & Books
March 2006

This paper is published in Conservation and Society, Volume 4, No. 1, March 2006 which mainly examine the detailed variations of CPR use across different agro-climatic zones and critically analyzing the implications of such variations in understanding of the commons.

Videos
January 2016

This presentation provides a historical overview of the role of the state in maintaining feudal structures and examines the roles and powers of tribal chiefs in post 1994 laws. It examines rural popular struggeles to challenge unaccountable tribal rule in the 1980s and the role of chiefs in the transition to democracy in South Africa

Farmworker literature review
Reports & Research
July 2016

This literature review aims to situate farm labour within the particular history of the development of agriculture in the Cape while providing a critical assessment of the changing approaches to thinking about farm workers and their socio-economic needs by employers and the state. The review aims to provide a knowledge baseline from which to distil key questions to guide an applied process of research and social dialogue in the Cape Winelands District and beyond

9 August 2017
Colombia

Communities have continued to suffer targeted killings, threats, displacement from their land and the effects of anti-personnel mines. 

Colombia's Indigenous peoples say their rights continue to be violated, and their land stolen, in spite of the peace deal signed last November between the government and FARC rebels.

13 August 2017
Australia

INDIGENOUS leaders will meet on Wednesday at a forum in Lismore as part of a state government review into the Aboriginal Land Rights Act.

Lismore is one of nine locations where the forums are being held as part of consultations to review the act to ensure its relevance for indigenous communities.

Ngulingah Local Aboriginal Land Council interim chief executive Daniel Rose is one of the Aboriginal Land Council executives who will be attending Wednesday's meeting, facilitated by former indigenous senator Aden Ridgeway.

Reports & Research
December 1999

The report was produced by National Sample Survey Organisation (NSSO), Government of India on Common Property Resources (CPR) in rural areas of the country, as part of its 54th Round survey conducted during January-June, 1998.

It presents a brief introduction to the perspectives and discussed on the definitions and concepts of CPR.  The enquiry aimed at providing certain basic statistics on the size of CPRs, type of benefits derived and the magnitude and proportion of households making use of CPRs.

Gender
Reports & Research
December 2014

Land, and in particular agricultural land, is central to livelhoods in rural Zambia. Zambia is characterised by a dual legal system of customary and statutory law and by dual land tenure, with state land and customary land. A first wave of socialist-oriented reforms took place after independence in 1964, which abolished previously existing freehold land in favour of leasehold. Subsequent changes in government policies under the influence of structural adjustment programmes and a new government in 1991 paved the way for a market-driven land reform.

No clear grounds
Reports & Research
March 2014

The global finance, energy and food crises are fuelling a global rush for land in developing countries. In their search for land, political leaders and investors look to Africa as a potential food supplier for the rest of the world. However, the current trend of land liberalisation rarely offers a solution to sustainable food production and poverty reduction among smallhold farmers in rural areas, as shown by this case study.

SLE_
Reports & Research
March 2017

Despite extensive research into rural development in sub-Saharan Africa, little is known about structural transformation1 in rural areas on the continent. Zambia was chosen as one of three case study countries2 in order to identify and to analyse rural transformation processes and their main influencing forces aiming at defining strategies and measures to influence such processes towards social inclusiveness and environmental sustainability until 2030.
Zambia shows a persisting copper-dependent mono-structure with selective transformation processes

Land administration
Journal Articles & Books
February 2014

The Land tenure system in Zambia is divided in the following administrative segments: colonial period
1880-1964; immediate post independence 1964-1975, post independence period of one party political