Access to Land & Tenure Security

Land tenure is the relationship, whether legally or customarily defined, among people, as individuals or groups, with respect to land. (For convenience, "land" is used here to include other natural resources such as water and trees.) Land tenure is an institution, i.e., rules invented by societies to regulate behaviour. Rules of tenure define how property rights to land are to be allocated within societies. They define how access is granted to rights to use, control, and transfer land, as well as associated responsibilities and restraints. In simple terms, land tenure systems determine who can use what resources for how long, and under what conditions.

Land tenure is an important part of social, political and economic structures. It is multi-dimensional, bringing into play social, technical, economic, institutional, legal and political aspects that are often ignored but must be taken into account. Land tenure relationships may be well-defined and enforceable in a formal court of law or through customary structures in a community. Alternatively, they may be relatively poorly defined with ambiguities open to exploitation.

Source: GLTN

 

Peer-reviewed publication
December 2009
Mozambique

Rural Communities have their own sets of laws rooted in their particular culture, environment, traditions and history that are separate from national laws. Lack of education, years of wartime political oppression and violence, and government-enforced cooperative ventures during the 1970’s have created a deep feeling of suspicion among rural small-scale farmers for all government laws and programs. This
conception has been reinforced by the fact that historically communities have only been made aware of

Peer-reviewed publication
April 2013
Mozambique

In international debates about land governance, Mozambique is often mentioned as an example of a country with favorable framework for local communities to benefit from landbased investments. However, it is also one of the countries highlighted in land grab debates for being one of the top countries where foreign companies and national elites are acquiring large extensions of land. It is increasingly clear that in spite of the favorable legal framework and pro-poor policies, local communities are under stress.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2016
Mozambique

Despite expanding policy commitments in many poor countries, health care is often a failure at the point of delivery. Lack of information, poor enforcement, and power dynamics prevent those whose rights have been violated from pursuing redress. In Mozambique, grassroots health advocates work to address this gap between policy and reality by blending approaches known as legal empowerment and social accountability.

Journal Articles & Books
January 2015
Mozambique

Under Mozambique’s Constitution and Land Law (1997), communities may legally govern their lands and natural resources according to customary norms and practices, so long as local customs do not contradict national law. However, rising land scarcity and associated increases in land value are leading some families to “reinterpret” custom as sanctioning the dispossession of widows from their marital lands.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2010
Mozambique

For two reasons the miombo woodlands of eastern and southern Africa provide an important opportunity for developing pro-poor payments for avoided deforestation and degradation. Firstly, there is strong scientific evidence that the loss of woodlands is associated with a decline in livelihoods. Secondly, there are two decades of successful community-based natural resource management (CBNRM) in the miombo region.

Journal Articles & Books
March 2017
Mozambique

Agriculture is an important engine for economic growth in Africa, but effective agricultural strategies to support rural development and poverty alleviation are scarce. State investment in the small-scale farming sector is minimal and the entrepreneurial family farm sector remains underrepresented. Meanwhile, large-scale land investments are advocated as means to bring capital to rural areas and stimulate development.

Journal Articles & Books
November 2012
Mozambique

Understanding how land use and its changes affect forest cover and carbon stocks is fundamental to developing sound REDD+ delivery options. A study in Manica Province, a REDD+ pilot area for Mozambique, suggests biomass and forest carbon fell substantially between 2007 and 2010. The study combined radar remote sensing information (to measure changes in biomass and carbon stocks) with field investigations (to establish land use and land cover changes, and their causes). Small-scale agriculture is responsible for nearly half of the loss.

Reports & Research
March 2016
Mozambique

This study examines the agricultural policies and strategies that have influenced agricultural development in Mozambique, the support structures that have been put in place, and the realities and challenges of their implementation. It was found that key stakeholders understand the concept of sustainable agriculture, that the most important contributing components are covered in the current policy framework, and that farmers are keen to adopt and adapt to more sustainable and profitable farming practices.

Reports & Research
June 2013
Mozambique

Mozambique is the 8th most vulnerable country to climate change and is one of the poorest countries in the world with a high dependency on foreign aid. The population is primarily rural and dependent on agriculture, with 60% living on the coastline. Droughts, flooding and cyclones affect particular regions of the country and these are projected to increase in frequency and severity.

Reports & Research
December 2010
Mozambique

After a number of constitutional amendments in 1990 had introduced the need to revise the legal framework for land and natural resources1, the government of Mozambique embarked upon a rather piecemeal process to develop a new policy and institutional framework for natural resource management. The main pillars of this framework consist of various pieces of legislation dealing with specific natural resources, such as the Land Law, the Forestry & Wildlife Law, the Mining Law and their related regulations and annexes.