Access to Land & Tenure Security

Land tenure is the relationship, whether legally or customarily defined, among people, as individuals or groups, with respect to land. (For convenience, "land" is used here to include other natural resources such as water and trees.) Land tenure is an institution, i.e., rules invented by societies to regulate behaviour. Rules of tenure define how property rights to land are to be allocated within societies. They define how access is granted to rights to use, control, and transfer land, as well as associated responsibilities and restraints. In simple terms, land tenure systems determine who can use what resources for how long, and under what conditions.

Land tenure is an important part of social, political and economic structures. It is multi-dimensional, bringing into play social, technical, economic, institutional, legal and political aspects that are often ignored but must be taken into account. Land tenure relationships may be well-defined and enforceable in a formal court of law or through customary structures in a community. Alternatively, they may be relatively poorly defined with ambiguities open to exploitation.

Source: GLTN

 

Agreements & Contracts
May 2009
Mozambique

Contrato Mineiro entre o Governo de Moçambique e Riverdale Moçambique Limitada.

Agreements & Contracts
January 2002
Mozambique

Contrato de prospecção , pesquisa, desenvolvimento e produção de mineras pesados nas áreas de Moma, Congolene e Quinga entre o Ministério dos Recursos Minerais e Kemmare Moma Mining Lda.

Reports & Research
December 2012
Mozambique

Mozambique has attracted two of the world’s largest mining companies – Brazil’s Companhia Vale do Rio Doce (Vale) and the Anglo-Australian multinational Rio Tinto – to extract coal from the huge fields in Tete province. In 2010, Vale and Rio Tinto were the second and third most valuable mining companies on earth – worth US$169 and US$83 billion respectively.

Reports & Research
October 2015
Mozambique

Mozambique is experiencing increased privatesector investment, to assist in meeting the country’s its development objectives. The government has intensified efforts to attract foreign direct investment, to improve Mozambique’s socioeconomic status and alleviate poverty. However, adequate legal frameworks are necessary to align investments with national priorities and to ensure compliance with environmental and social safeguards.

Reports & Research
June 2017
Mozambique

The FAO-EU FLEGT Programme has committed to a significant contribution to global Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade (FLEGT) achievements in 2017 under the Phase III programme. This year’s objectives were to increasingly operationalize the projects that were endorsed under the first two calls for proposals in the Voluntary Partnership Agreement (VPA) countries and ensure productive results from these projects that will have a positive effect on the VPA processes.

Reports & Research
June 2017
Mozambique

Welcome to this inaugural issue of a quarterly Bulletin that highlights outbreaks of transboundary pests and diseases that have the potential to impact food and nutrition security in southern Africa. The Bulletin also captures recently concluded and upcoming events that are being organized by Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and stakeholders to improve the capacities of partners in preparedness and response to crop and livestock emergencies in the
region.

Journal Articles & Books
June 2017
Mozambique

For over a decade ActionAid Mozambique (AAMoz) has worked with strategic partner organisations in the south and north-east of the country to promote agroecology initiatives with 80 farmers’ associations consisting of over 8000 farmers. 96% of the members are women and 30% of them young people, cultivating an average of 90.9 hectares per association and striving to improve agricultural production.

Reports & Research
July 2016
Mozambique

This Country Programming Framework (CPF) sets out three government priority areas to guide the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) partnership and support with the Government of Mozambique – bringing together innovative international best practices and global standards with national and regional expertise during 5 years from 2016 to 2020.

Reports & Research
December 2010
Mozambique

The complex relationship between law, land rights and customary practices is increasingly recognized as foundational to formulating successful development policies. Similarly, the essential role of women’s economic participation to development and the current trend of gender discriminatory land and inheritance customary practices have prompted domestic civil society organizations in developing countries to use statutory provisions guaranteeing gender equality to improve women’s land tenure security.

Reports & Research
December 2010
Mozambique

This study examines the statutory recognition of customary land tenure in Botswana, Mozambique and Tanzania, which were chosen as case studies because of the diverse approaches to the issue they represent. Botswana's Tribal Land Act (1968) established a system of regional land boards and transferred the land administration and management powers of customary leaders to the boards, which originally included both customary leaders and state officials among their members.