Access to Land & Tenure Security

Land tenure is the relationship, whether legally or customarily defined, among people, as individuals or groups, with respect to land. (For convenience, "land" is used here to include other natural resources such as water and trees.) Land tenure is an institution, i.e., rules invented by societies to regulate behaviour. Rules of tenure define how property rights to land are to be allocated within societies. They define how access is granted to rights to use, control, and transfer land, as well as associated responsibilities and restraints. In simple terms, land tenure systems determine who can use what resources for how long, and under what conditions.

Land tenure is an important part of social, political and economic structures. It is multi-dimensional, bringing into play social, technical, economic, institutional, legal and political aspects that are often ignored but must be taken into account. Land tenure relationships may be well-defined and enforceable in a formal court of law or through customary structures in a community. Alternatively, they may be relatively poorly defined with ambiguities open to exploitation.

Source: GLTN

 

Policy Papers & Briefs
July 2013

This issue brief presents an overview of REDD+ and the associated tenure and property rights challenges and opportunities.
Spanish Translation
Release Date: Wednesday, April 17, 2013File:  Land Tenure and REDD+: Risks to Property Rights and Opportunities for Economic Growth

Policy Papers & Briefs
April 2012

The limited research on the benefits of women gaining secure rights to land and property suggest positive results: an increase in women’s participation in household decision-making; an increase in net household income; a reduction in domestic violence; an increased ability to prevent being infected by HIV/AIDS; and increased expenditures on food and education for children. Understanding the complexity surrounding women’s land rights is critical to ensuring that those rights are protected and improved.

Policy Papers & Briefs
July 2013

Food security exists when all people, at all times, have physical and economic access to sufficient, safe, and nutritious food that meets their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life. The term “food security” is used to describe food availability, access, and use at many levels, including the global, national, local, household, and intra household levels.

Reports & Research
January 2014

In line with the conventional view that customary land rights impede agricultural development, the traditional tenure system in Nigeria has been perceived to obstruct the achievement of efficient development and agricultural transformation. This led to the Land Use Act (LUA) of 1978.

Reports & Research
January 2014

"For millions of people living in the world’s poorest countries, access to land is a matter not of wealth, but of survival, identity and belonging. Most of the 1.4 billion people earning less than US$1.25 a day live in rural areas and depend largely on agriculture for their livelihoods, while an estimated 2.5 billion people are involved in full- or part-time smallholder agriculture.

Policy Papers & Briefs
January 2014

In 2003, the Maputo Declaration of the African Union stated that, within five years, 10 per cent of budgets of member states would be dedicated to agriculture. Ten years on, despite spending increases by some countries African governments still allocate an average of only 4 per cent of their national budgets to agriculture. Only eight out of 54 countries under the African Union have consistently reached the 10 per cent target.

Closed
26 November 2013 to 19 December 2013
Facilitators
Paulmer

En los últimos diez años, el sector agrícola del Perú ha crecido un 4 por ciento al año, beneficiándose de una mejor salud agrícola y del aumento de la demanda internacional de frutas, verduras y otros productos agrícolas no tradicionales (BID, 2010). La participación de las mujeres peruanas en el sector es también significativa.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2013

Full citation: Dookie, C., Lambrou, Y., and Petrics, H., "CEDAW: A Tool for Gender-Sensitive Agriculture and Rural Development Policy and Programme Formulation," FAO PUBLICATION (FAO, 2013).

Reports & Research
January 2009

[via UN-HABITAT] GLTN considers gender as a critical cross-cutting theme in the work on promoting pro-poor, large-scale land tools (for more information on GLTN see www.gltn.net). This short report summarises an analysis undertaken by the GLTN Secretariat to assess how women’s rights, and specific needs, are being addressed by selected projects in the GLTN land tool inventory—a database consisting of numerous international development projects in the land sector is available on the website.