Rangelands grazing pressure under the spotlight image
31 July 2017
Australia

RESEARCH looking at the demand for forage by all grazing animals is underway in a project that could deliver valuable information to rangelands livestock producers about the time when risks of losing feedbase occur.

This unique national study will apply a  cross sector and jurisdiction approach to also deliver a solid base of information to natural resource managers.

NSW Department of Primary Industries senior research scientist Dr Cathy Waters, based at Trangie Research Centre, is leading the Meat and Livestock Australia-supported project.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2010

Establishment of seasonal grazing enclosures has become an important rangeland rehabilitation strategy in semi-arid regions. This study assessed the impact of enclosure age and enclosure management on the vegetation composition in the Njemps Flats range unit, Lake Baringo Basin (Kenya). Six communal enclosures (13-23 years since establishment) and six private enclosures (3-17 years since establishment) were selected.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2013

Rangelands encompass 30-40% of Earth's land surface and support 1-2 billion people. Their predominant use is extensive livestock production by pastoralists and ranchers. But rangelands are characterized by ecological, economic, and political marginality, and higher-value, more intensive land uses are impinging on rangelands around the world. Earth Stewardship of rangelands must address both livestock management and the broader socioecological dynamics that promote land-use changes, fragmentation, and degradation.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2005

Traditionally, management of rangelands is based on the successional theory for vegetation developed by Clements. This approach, which came to be known as “the range succession model”, assumes a progressive change of vegetation towards the final (climax) stage and considers grazing as a primary driver of its dynamics. This model cannot be applied in Mediterranean rangelands, however, because they are largely modified plant communities and their final stage is usually a forest or dense woodland.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2013

Recent studies using low-resolution satellite time series show that the Sahelian belt of West Africa is witnessing an increase in vegetation cover/biomass, called re-greening. However, detailed information on local processing and changes is rare or lacking. A multi-temporal set of Landsat images was used to produce land-cover maps for the years 2000 and 2007 in a semi-arid region of Niger, where an anomalous vegetation trend was previously detected.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2011

The status of many invasive plant species that are also of high commercial value is contentious. Management of negative impacts depends on the support and co-operation of people who regard the species as an asset. For example, buffel grass (Cenchrus ciliaris) is highly prized by many pastoralists in Australia as an introduced pasture grass for livestock but it also has significant and deleterious environmental impacts. Identifying management strategies that minimise environmental impacts yet support production benefits is crucial for achieving sustainable outcomes.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2012

BACKGROUND: Pastoralism in the USA began coincidently with the initiation of profound ecological change resulting from colonization in the sixteenth century. Relationships between pastoralism and wildlife conservation in three different contexts of land tenure, environmental legacy, and geography are examined. RESULTS: On the federal rangelands of the Intermountain West, based on limited scientific information, wildlife policy has been interpreted to require separation of native bighorn sheep from livestock to prevent disease transmission.