property law

Synonyms
property regulation

Property law is the generic term within which falls the legal framework dealing with property, its use, ownership, regulation and disposition. As such, property law applies both to real property and personal property, and is distinguished from land law which applies only to real property.

Land rights in Bangladesh
5 December 2017
Bangladesh

With a population of 163 million people and an area of only 147,570 square kilometers, Bangladesh is one of the most densely populated countries in the world. Land scarcity, insecure tenure, and other factors have contributed to a high volume of land conflicts. Such problems are compounded by Bangladesh’s weak land governance systems, extensive informal settlements in urban areas and widespread landlessness in rural areas.

Hurricane Irma centered over the island of Barbuda.
Antigua and Barbuda

Five weeks ago ‘A land rights storm brewing in Barbuda’ was reprinted on this portal. This told the sorry tale of the Prime Minister of Antigua & Barbuda using the catastrophic damage wrecked on the island by Hurricane Irma as the excuse to get rid of the collective ownership of Barbudans of their island once and for all.

1 December 2017

Location

Indufor
740 15th St NW #900
20005 Washington , District Of Columbia
United States
District Of Columbia US
Global
In developing countries, it is almost impossible to determine fair values for rural land. That’s because traditional valuation approaches – like the comparable sales method – don’t work in thin markets, and don’t take into account environmental, social, and cultural value that communities place on their land.
 
Customary Land Recognition: Zambian Approach to Documentation and Administration
Coming soon
15 January 2018 to 6 February 2018
Facilitators
Andrew Chilombo
mattsommerville
Global
Zambia

USAID’s Tenure and Global Climate Change Program will facilitate a dialogue on experiences of documenting household and community-level customary rights in Zambia. The dialogue will bring together the perspectives of government, traditional leaders, practitioners, civil society, and academics to consider how customary land documentation can contribute to national development goals and increased service delivery in rural and peri-urban areas.

Closed
2 November 2017 to 15 November 2017
Facilitators
LorenzoCotula
Global

The 5th UK Land Forum meeting discussed approaches and tools, and practical experience in legal empowerment. It  also provided updates on recent activities of Forum members, including DFID.  

The purpose of the Forum was to provide a focus for debate, information and lesson sharing amongst UK stakeholders to inform DFID and wider UK policy and programming for strengthening of land governance and land rights protection.

The biennial Grassroots Justice Prize competition recognizes grassroots organizations and institutions, large and small, across the globe, that are working to put the power of law into people's hands.
31 October 2017
Global

Across the globe, grassroots organizations are combatting injustice by helping people to understand, use, and shape the laws that affect them. Few of them receive the recognition they deserve. We want to change that. 

In 2015, Namati launched the world’s first competition to celebrate great deeds in the field of legal empowerment. This year, the biennial Grassroots Justice Prize returns -- bigger and better than before. 

Reports & Research
Policy Papers & Briefs
December 2011
China
Eastern Asia
Oceania

Doing Business sheds light on how easy or difficult it is for a local entrepreneur to open and run a small to medium-size business when complying with relevant regulations. It measures and tracks changes in regulations affecting 10 areas in the life cycle of a business: starting a business, dealing with construction permits, getting electricity, registering property, getting credit, protecting investors, paying taxes, trading across borders, enforcing contracts and resolving insolvency.

Will formalising property rights reduce poverty in South Africa’s ‘second economy’?
Policy Papers & Briefs
October 2005
Global
Africa
South Africa

De Soto’s influential book The mystery of capital offers a simple yet beguiling message: capitalism can be made to work for the poor, through formalising their property rights in houses, land and small businesses. This approach resonates strongly in the South African context, where private property works well for those who inhabit the so-called ‘first economy’. Evidence from South Africa, however, suggests that many of de Soto’s policy prescriptions may be inappropriate for the poorest and most vulnerable in our society, and have negative impacts on their security and well-being.