pastoral land rights

pastoral land rights refer to the right to use specific pastoral land.

Peer-reviewed publication
October 2014

In a modeling study we examine vulnerability of income from mobile (transhumant) pastoralism and sedentary pastoralism to reduced mean annual precipitation (MAP) and droughts. The study is based on empirical data of a 3410 km2 research region in southern, semi-arid Morocco. The land use decision model integrates a meta-model of the Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) simulator to depict perennial and annual forage plant development. It also includes livestock dynamics and forward-looking decision making under uncertain weather.

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Policy Papers & Briefs
December 2014

In the year 2014, the PP has recorded great achievements in terms of revised outcomes. Some unique and strategic approaches employed by the PP are partly the reason for the achievements. This brief is a summary of the key achievements made and the strategies or approaches used in 2014. 

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Policy Papers & Briefs
December 2013

Tanzania Natural Resource Forum in partnership with Care international implements a five years pastoralist programme (2012-2016) through registered Tanzanian Civil society Organizations (CSOs) and/or Community Based Organizations (CBOs) that work to improve the capacity of communities to overcome poverty, reduce vulnerability and strengthen the rights of men and women for sustainable livelihoods. This brief covers some highlights for 2013.

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Journal Articles & Books
May 2017

Land-use conflict is not a new phenomenon for pastoralists  and farmers in Tanzania with murders, the killing of livestock and the loss of property as  a  consequence of  this  conflict  featuring   in  the  news  for  many years  now.  Various actors,  including civil society organisations, have tried  to  address  farmer–pastoralist conflict through  mass  education programmes, land-use planning, policy reforms and  the development of community institutions. However, these efforts have not succeeded in the conflict.

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Policy Papers & Briefs
August 2016

This briefing note call attention to the ongoing situation of harassments and arbitrary arrests of human rights defenders in Loliondo in northern Tanzania.It offers an account of the recent events taking place in the area and background information.

IWGIA believes that these developments are a cause of great concern. The detentions, harassment and trumped up charges undermine civil society and other stakeholders, limiting their options to carry out human rights work in Tanzania.

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Reports & Research
January 2016

The report explores the evictions of pastoralists and other conflicts over pastoralists’ land in Tanzania, with focus on the past decade. 

Although most of these evictions and land based conflicts have been documented, the associated human and legal rights violations have increasingly lead to concern amongst civil society. A study was therefore commissioned to collate the available information as well as to visit affected pastoralist communities to assess the current situation faced by pastoralists in the country. 

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Policy Papers & Briefs
December 2015

Eviction of Indigenous Peoples from their ancestral lands is one of the most destructive and degrading mitigation strategy performed by modern governments in developing countries to address climate change. Armed police and soldiers are used to forcefully evict indigenous peoples to pave the way for investors and conservation in the name of climate change mitigation.

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Policy Papers & Briefs
March 2015

In early 2015, Maasai and Datoga citizens living in the Morogoro region of Tanzania were victims of deadly, ethnic violence. According to reports from local media, the assaults were instigated by public figures interested in acquiring land, and state authorities have not intervened to protect Maasai citizens. Police protection has instead been given to others who are illegally cultivating officially registered Maasai land. 

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Journal Articles & Books
December 2014

This revised and updated edition of Albert Kwokwo Barume’s book from 2010 reflects some of the latest developments affecting Africa’s indigenous peoples and their land rights. 

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Reports & Research
March 2013

Pastoralists in Tanzania are suffering from many human rights violations, including forced evictions from their lands. This report gives a comprehensive analysis of the human rights situation of indigenous peoples in Tanzania, and documents cases of human rights violations against Maasai pastoralists during 2011. 

The information contained in this report is a result of a comprehensive survey and human rights analysis, which used both primary and secondary data collection methodologies covering a total of 10 districts and 18 villages.