land reform

A government policy of splitting up agricultural land and dividing it up between those people who do not own any land.

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Journal Articles & Books
July 2015

Land is a cross-cutting theme in most contemporary development challenges. Contemporary literature shows that land governance benefits the broader administration and governance of society. Tools enabling evaluation of land governance, however, are often focuses on national or supranational levels. Ethiopia provides a case in point: rapid urbanization and urban poverty are an issue; however, limited studies assess urban land governance from a multi-stakeholder perspective. Citizens and government representatives at different levels are the sources of information.

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Journal Articles & Books
January 2015

Over the last decade, the Government of Rwanda (GoR) has introduced several land reforms through formulation and enactment of enabling legal framework, establishment of land administration institutions and implementation of national land tenure regularization. Further, the Land Act of 2013 stipulated that all landholders must formally register their land. To support registration compliance, the GoR decentralized the Land Administration System (LAS) to all District Land Bureaus (DLBs).

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Journal Articles & Books
July 2013

Developing countries are facing a number of challenges in search of development. Various policies and strategies have been formulated and many are already in the process of implementation in different countries. Among the policies are National Land Policies (NLP).

26 May 2017

Colonialism brought large-scale farming to Africa, promising modernisation and jobs – but often dispossessing people and exploiting workers. Now, after several decades of independence, and with investor interest growing, African governments are once again promoting large plantations and estates. But the new corporate interest in African agriculture has been criticised as a “land grab”.

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Peer-reviewed publication
August 2014

Beginning in the mid-1970s through to the 1980s, Tanzania experienced a severe socio-economic crisis. In an attempt to turn things around the abating economy and accelerate economic growth, the government embarked on a broad range of radical policy, legislation, and institution reforms, which opened doors for foreign direct investments (FDIs) and further initiatives have been taken to create an enabling environment for investments to flourish in the country.

Reports & Research
December 2006

Most of the world’s poor work in the “informal economy” – outside of recognized and enforceable rules. Thus, even though most have assets of some kind, they have no way to document their possessions because they lack formal access to legally recognized tools such as deeds, contracts and permits. The Commission on Legal Empowerment of the Poor (CLEP) is the first global anti-poverty initiative focusing on the link between exclusion, poverty and law, looking for practical solutions to the challenges of poverty.

Policy Papers & Briefs
December 2004

L’accès à la terre est indispensable pour produire de la nourriture et créer des revenus. C’est aussi un atout social et économique déterminant qui donne accès à l’identité culturelle, au pouvoir politique et à la prise de décisions. Les préjugés sociaux et culturels sont souvent responsables d’une discrimination à l’égard d’un sexe, d’une classe sociale ou d’un groupe ethnique.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2002

Land and land reform cover a great range, both in terms of the geographical and development status of the countries considered, and of the variety of perspectives on the issues. The articles in this issue of Land Reform, Land Resettlement and Cooperatives reflect this breadth in a variety of ways. The articles range geographically from the paper addressing land and agrarian reform in Colombia, by Professor Darío Fajardo, to a consideration of the land reforms currently under way in Scotland, by Douglas Macmillan, Ken Thomson and Bill Slee.

Reports & Research
December 2010

Land Tenure Working Paper 15. This publication brings to light the existing linkages between land tenure and the realization of the right to food. It points out that responsible governance of land requires the adoption of human rights-based approach in order to develop coherent and long term solutions to improve people’s livelihoods. The document presents the legal implications of the right to food at national level and provides a series of examples on the implementation of human rights principles and obligations into land tenure systems, policies, and institutional frameworks.