land investments

Acquisition of land for future benefits

Food Security

Technical experts from G7 donors (UK, US, Germany, France), AU Land Policy Initiative and FAO have compiled a due diligence framework for land related investments based on existing standards, guidance and good practice, to support responsible investments under the New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition.

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Peer-reviewed publication
August 2014

Beginning in the mid-1970s through to the 1980s, Tanzania experienced a severe socio-economic crisis. In an attempt to turn things around the abating economy and accelerate economic growth, the government embarked on a broad range of radical policy, legislation, and institution reforms, which opened doors for foreign direct investments (FDIs) and further initiatives have been taken to create an enabling environment for investments to flourish in the country.

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Reports & Research
January 2016

The report explores the evictions of pastoralists and other conflicts over pastoralists’ land in Tanzania, with focus on the past decade. 

Although most of these evictions and land based conflicts have been documented, the associated human and legal rights violations have increasingly lead to concern amongst civil society. A study was therefore commissioned to collate the available information as well as to visit affected pastoralist communities to assess the current situation faced by pastoralists in the country. 

24 May 2017

O Ministério da Agricultura, através do Projeto de Apoio ao Desenvolvimento Económico das Regiões Sul (PADES), financiado pelo Fundo Internacional de Desenvolvimento Agrícola (FIDA), vai investir cerca de 19 milhões de dólares americanos naquela zona dentro de seis anos (2015 á 2021).

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Policy Papers & Briefs
June 2013

Parakuiyo Pastoralists Indigenous Community Development Organization (PAICODEO), PINGOs Forum, Tanzania Land Alliance (TALA), the Legal and Human Rights Centre (LHRC) and journalists from ITV, Star TV, Channel 10 and Mwananchi newspaper have conducted a fact finding mission concerning the forced evictions of pastoralists in Kilombero and Ulanga districts in Morogoro region in Tanzania. The fact finding mission was carried out from 12.11 – 15.11 2012. 

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Policy Papers & Briefs
November 2012

The study reveals a lack of accountability and governance in managing biofuel investments in the country. As a result, biofuel investments have done little to alleviate poverty, empower villagers, and protect the environment. As villages were unprepared, hastened to make decision, and were lured by words of the investors and leaders who promoted the benefits of the investment more than its threats.

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Reports & Research
July 2013

The increasing importance of the Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) in Tanzania, where 17 WMAs are now functioning and 22 others are in various stages of development, begs the question of what successes have been achieved and what challenges remain to be addressed if this Community-Based Conservation model is to be sustained and even scaled up. There has not been a country-wide evaluation of WMAs since the pilot-phase evaluation in 2007 at a time when most WMAs were too new to yield firm projections for the long term.

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Peer-reviewed publication
October 2012

Like many of its neighbors, Tanzania is experiencing a well-documented surge of land grabbing related to investments in industries such as agriculture, biofuels, tourism, hunting, and forestry. Land grabbing in Tanzania is best understood and analyzed as both a symptom of and contributor towards wider political economic processes of change occurring in Tanzania.

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Policy Papers & Briefs
September 2013

Large-scale land acquisitions are increasing in pace and scale, in particular across parts of Africa, Asia and Latin America. Weak governance and poor land use planning mean that commercial ‘land grabs’ often damage biodiversity as well as dispossessing people from customary rights and livelihoods. Land can also be ‘grabbed’ for ‘green’ purposes, triggering conflicts that undermine potential synergies. Expanded state protected areas, land for carbon offset markets and REDD, and for private conservation projects all potentially conflict with community rights.

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Reports & Research
December 2012

In this publication two pioneering grassroots organisations from northern Tanzania examine and present their experiences and insights from their long-term work to secure the land rights of hunter-gatherer and pastoral communities. The case studies were presented at a one-day learning event held on 5th October 2012, when Pastoral Women’s Council (PWC) and Ujamaa Community Resource Team (UCRT) joined together to share and reflect on their work to secure land rights, to learn from each other, and to identify ways to build on their achievements moving forward.