land governance

Panelists at the 2017 UN High Level Political Forum Side Event on Monitoring Tenure Security in the SDGs
Global

By Dr. Jamal Browne

The successes of the Global Land Indicators Initiative (GLII) to date are worth celebrating. Today, we recognize the efforts of partners from every corner of the world, who through their perpetual optimism, have brought us many steps closer to making data collection and reporting on tenure security globally comparable.

Closed
24 April 2017 to 12 May 2017
Facilitators
Joana Rocha Dias
Henrique Pires dos Santos
Mozambique
Angola
Sao Tome and Principe
Cape Verde
Guinea-Bissau
Brazil
Timor-Leste
Portugal
CPLP countries

 

wordcloud
Angola
Brazil
Cape Verde
CPLP countries
Equatorial Guinea
Guinea-Bissau
Mozambique
Portugal
Sao Tome and Principe
Timor-Leste

 

Anúncio 1.2

 

Reports & Research
June 2015
Uganda

The constitution and enabling legislation in Uganda, as in many other countries, empower the government to acquire land in the public interest. Under Ugandan law a person whose land is identified for a public purpose must be compensated fairly, promptly, and prior to the acquisition of the property.

Policy Papers & Briefs
January 2017
Uganda

The ways in which people obtain land in Uganda are changing fast. Land that used to be secured through inheritance, gifts or proof of long-term occupancy is now more commonly changing hands in the market. Those with wealth and powerful connections are frequently able to override local rules and gain access to land at the expense of poorer individuals. Government-backed agribusiness investors receive large areas of land with benefits for some local farmers who are able to participate in the schemes, while other smallholders see their land access and livelihoods degraded.

Peer-reviewed publication
December 2007
Uganda

This guide has been written as an information resource for government officials, community leaders, humanitarian aid workers, judges, lawyers and others whose responsibilities include upholding land and property rights in Uganda. It outlines the main provisions of Uganda’s constitutional and legal framework and the protection these provide to property rights. It briefly outlines the historical background to existing land tenure relations, describes the constitutional provisions relating to land in the 1995 Constitution and sets out the main provisions of the Land Act 1998.

Policy Papers & Briefs
August 2016
Uganda

Food security in Uganda relies mainly on access to land and security of tenure. Land governance is marked by the contradiction between relatively progressive legislation and only partial implementation. Institutions that have to deal with land administration and land disputes, such as customary authority systems, local government, and special courts for land justice, have weakened in the last years. Women’s position with respect to land and inheritance also remains weak, both legally and in practice, undermining their livelihoods and status in society.