land distribution

Description

Laos - Land law no 4

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"Article 1. Objectives of the Land Law:

The objectives of the Land Law are to determine the regime on the management, protection and use of land in order to ensure efficiency and conformity with [land-use] objectives1 and with laws and regulations[,] and to contribute to national socio-economic development as well as to the protection of the environment and national borders of the Lao People's Democratic Republic."

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October 2003

Transparency Under Scrutiny: Information Disclosure by the Parliamentary Land Investigation Commission in Myanmar

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This case study presents a country-wide quantitative analysis of a Parliamentary Commission established in 2012 in Myanmar to examine ‘land grab’ cases considered and to propose solutions towards releasing the land to its original owners, in most cases smallholder farming families. The study analyses the information contained in four reports released to the public, but also aims to elicit information they do not reveal.

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February 2017

USAID Country Profile: Property Rights and Resource Governance - Lao PDR

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OVERVIEW: The Lao People’s Democratic Republic (Lao PDR) is a landlocked country situated in Southeast Asia, bordering Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, China and Myanmar. Despite a recent increase in the rate of urbanization and a relatively small amount of arable land per capita, most people in Lao PDR live in rural areas and work in an agriculture sector dominated by subsistence farming. Lao PDR’s economy relies heavily on its natural resources, with over half the country’s wealth produced by agricultural land, forests, water and hydropower and mineral resources.

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December 2011

USAID Country Profile: Property Rights and Resource Governance - Thailand

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OVERVIEW: Thailand is facing the challenges of a transition from lower- to upper-middle-income status. After decades of very rapid growth followed by more modest 5–6% growth after the Asian financial crisis of 1997–98, Thailand achieved a per capita GNI of US $3670 by 2008, reduced its poverty rate to less than 10% and greatly extended coverage of social services. Infant mortality has been cut to only 13 per 1000, and 98% of the population has access to clean water and sanitation.

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December 2011

Myanmar: Land Tenure Issues and the Impact on Rural Development

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ABSTRACTED FROM THE EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: Myanmar’s agricultural sector has for long suffered due to multiplicity of laws and regulations, deficient and degraded infrastructure, poor policies and planning, a chronic lack of credit, and an absence of tenure security for cultivators. These woes negate Myanmar’s bountiful natural endowments and immense agricultural potential, pushing its rural populace towards dire poverty. This review hopes to contribute to the ongoing debate on land issues in Myanmar.

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December 2015
A demanda vai além das famílias que orbitam em torno do MST

Por que a reforma agrária continua importante

 

Gustavo Noronha - Economista do Incra

Estudo da Oxfam aponta o aumento da concentração de terras no Brasil, que nunca levou a cabo uma distribuição efetiva das áreas rurais

Reforma y nueva politica sobre la tierra

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Una propuesta política a favor de reestructurar la tenencia de la tierra en el Ecuador es un tema complejo, hay quienes se oponen a cualquier proceso de redistribución, tanto de la tierra como de los recursos productivos y otros que están a favor de una reforma agraria. El documento pone énfasis en las posiciones que reconocen la necesidad políticas redistributivas de tierras mediante una nueva política sobre la tierra.

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February 2010

Improving Tenure Security for the Rural Poor. Rwanda – Country Case Study

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Most of the world’s poor work in the “informal economy” – outside of recognized and enforceable rules.
Thus, even though most have assets of some kind, they have no way to document their possessions
because they lack formal access to legally recognized tools such as deeds, contracts and permits.
The Commission on Legal Empowerment of the Poor (CLEP) is the first global anti-poverty initiative
focusing on the link between exclusion, poverty and law, looking for practical solutions to the challenges

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December 2006