land administration

Zambia National Resettlement Policy
National Policies
October 2015

Government has been implementing the Land Resettlement Programme for over twenty four (24) years, focusing mainly on land resettlement for agricultural purposes without a comprehensive policy and legal framework. This has caused a number of challenges including lack of a coordination mechanism at higher level of Government in the implementation of the land resettlement programme, land disputes and low levels of infrastructure development and service provision in the resettlement schemes.

19 March 2018 to 23 March 2018

Location

World Bank Headquarters
1818 H Street, NW
20433 Washington , District Of Columbia
United States
District Of Columbia US
Global

The World Bank is pleased to invite abstract submissions for the 19th Annual Conference on Land and Poverty to be held March 19 – 23, 2018 in Washington, DC, USA.

The Land and Poverty conference will present the latest research and practice on the diversity of reforms, interventions, and innovations in the land sector around the world. The 2018 conference theme will be: Land Governance in an Interconnected World

Journal Articles & Books
October 2014

This monograph is published by Centre for Economic and Social Studies (CESS), Hyderabad observed large scale acquisition of agricultural lands in India in recent years for Special Economic Zones (SEZs), thermal power plants, irrigation projects etc., have become serious issue of socio-political contestation. Large scale corporate land grab taken place due to big involvement of private sector. In undivided Andhra Pradesh state, land acquisition for irrigation projects and SEZs, industrial and power projects in private sector are major issues of contention.

Gender
Reports & Research
December 2014

Land, and in particular agricultural land, is central to livelhoods in rural Zambia. Zambia is characterised by a dual legal system of customary and statutory law and by dual land tenure, with state land and customary land. A first wave of socialist-oriented reforms took place after independence in 1964, which abolished previously existing freehold land in favour of leasehold. Subsequent changes in government policies under the influence of structural adjustment programmes and a new government in 1991 paved the way for a market-driven land reform.

No clear grounds
Reports & Research
March 2014

The global finance, energy and food crises are fuelling a global rush for land in developing countries. In their search for land, political leaders and investors look to Africa as a potential food supplier for the rest of the world. However, the current trend of land liberalisation rarely offers a solution to sustainable food production and poverty reduction among smallhold farmers in rural areas, as shown by this case study.

Land administration in Zambia
Reports & Research
December 1995

All land in Zambia is vested in the president, in trust for the people of Zambia, under the Land (Conversion of Titles) Act, 1975 (see p.16), SECTION4.The president has delegated landadministration to the Commissioner of Lands under Statutory Instrument No. 7 of 1964 and GazetteNotice No. 1345 of 1975, as amended. Land in Zambia is divided into State (formerly crown),Reserve, and Trust Lands, as well as park reserves.

Customary land in Zambia
Reports & Research
February 2009

The study has established that customary land in Zambia is enormously significant because land is central to human existence and a large proportion of Zambians depend on it for their livelihood. Customary land in Zambia is the source of food and other necessaries for human existence for the villagers whose entire spectrum of perceptions of life are rooted in the cultural configurations and heritage of rural activities. Further, the study has found that the land can be made more productive without converting it to leasehold.

Agric status in Zambia
Reports & Research
August 2016

Zambia’s agriculture sector provides the main support for the rural economy. This assertion is based on the fact that about forty nine percent of the Zambian population depends on agriculture, primarily through smallholder production for their livelihoods and employment (CSO, 2014). Notwithstanding this fact, in 2015 the sector contributed 8.5 percent to the GDP and approximately 9.6 percent of national export earnings (CSO, 2015; World Bank, 2016). The potential for agricultural growth in Zambia is staggering.