indigenous land rights

17 May 2017

 A Brazilian congressional commission, led by a powerful farming lobby, has recommended dismantling the National Indian Foundation, or FUNAI, indigenous rights agency following a land boundary investigation.

The commission suggested FUNAI, which is run by anthropologists, should be replaced with an agency run by the Brazilian Ministry of Justice.

Critics have slammed the suggestion, arguing dismantling FUNAI would empower farmers who seek to use more land in the Amazon rainforest, Jornal O Globo reported.

Autor: Fernando campos Scaff

Fonte: http://www.conjur.com.br/2017-mai-19/direito-agronegocio-aquisicao-terras-estrangeiros-questao-nao-resolvida

Mantém-se a discussão no Congresso Nacional sobre a aquisição de terras por estrangeiros, visando a formulação de uma nova lei que possa tratar adequadamente essa matéria.

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Policy Papers & Briefs
March 2015

In early 2015, Maasai and Datoga citizens living in the Morogoro region of Tanzania were victims of deadly, ethnic violence. According to reports from local media, the assaults were instigated by public figures interested in acquiring land, and state authorities have not intervened to protect Maasai citizens. Police protection has instead been given to others who are illegally cultivating officially registered Maasai land. 

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Policy Papers & Briefs
June 2014

This case study focuses on the capacity of local communities to monitor biodiversity and resources in Madagascar, Nicaragua, Philippines and Tanzania. It makes a controlled comparison between local community monitoring and trained scientists’ monitoring and conclude that local and indigenous communities generate similar and equally good outputs as the trained scientists, and are much more cost efficient. The cases suggest that it is fully possible to build a cheap and effective MRV system based on community monitoring of Non-Carbon Benefits

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Policy Papers & Briefs
June 2013

Parakuiyo Pastoralists Indigenous Community Development Organization (PAICODEO), PINGOs Forum, Tanzania Land Alliance (TALA), the Legal and Human Rights Centre (LHRC) and journalists from ITV, Star TV, Channel 10 and Mwananchi newspaper have conducted a fact finding mission concerning the forced evictions of pastoralists in Kilombero and Ulanga districts in Morogoro region in Tanzania. The fact finding mission was carried out from 12.11 – 15.11 2012. 

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Policy Papers & Briefs
August 2009

This urgent alert is based on the forceful evictions of Maasai pastoralists from their homes and grazing lands in Loliondo Division, Ngorongoro District in Northern Tanzania and the gross human rights violations that are being committed. 

The eviction operation started on the 4th July 2009 and was conducted by the notorious riot police, the Field Force Unit, with assistance of private guards from the Otterlo Business Cooperation (OBC). They entered the villages by shooting in the air and using teargas before pouring petrol on the Maasai homes and setting them on fire.

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Reports & Research
December 2003

This study documents the plight of the Maasai pastoralists who have moved to Morogoro and Kilosa districts as a result of the recent socio-economic developments and environmental changes in Maasailand. The objective of this study was to analyse how the Maasai migrants have adapted themselves to the new ecological conditions and the impact of such adaptations on their livelihoods.

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Journal Articles & Books
December 2012

 This paper explores the development of a pilot PES scheme in the Tarangire ecosystem of Tanzania in response to specifi c wildlife declines and policy constraints. It charts the development of this initiative from its genesis based on PES experiences in Kenya. This paper specifi cally explores the questions of whether the utilization of free-market enterprise tools to achieve conservation goals infl uences Maasai livelihood diversifi cation in ways that are compatible with conservation.

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Peer-reviewed publication
December 2010

Rights-based conservation depends on institutions that give citizens clear and enforceable rights to manage lands and natural resources. Such rights hinge on citizens’ abilities to strengthen and defend their rights and on the operation of the rule of law and impersonal forms of government for legal reforms to take place and have meaning.