forest conservation

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
Global

By Professor Jeffrey Sachs, Chairman of the Advisory Board of CCSI, University Professor at Columbia University, and Director of the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network

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12 October 2017
Cameroon

Date : 4 octobre 2017

Source : Cameroun Info

Par : Géraldine Ivaha

D’après des organisations de la société civile (OSC), l’Etat perd plus 100 milliards de FCFA de recettes fiscales chaque année. Des chiffres contestés par le gouvernement qui estime plutôt à environ sept milliards les pertes qu’il dit tout faire pour rendre résiduelles.

Reports & Research
October 2015
Mozambique

Mozambique is experiencing increased privatesector investment, to assist in meeting the country’s its development objectives. The government has intensified efforts to attract foreign direct investment, to improve Mozambique’s socioeconomic status and alleviate poverty. However, adequate legal frameworks are necessary to align investments with national priorities and to ensure compliance with environmental and social safeguards.

Reports & Research
June 2017
Mozambique

The FAO-EU FLEGT Programme has committed to a significant contribution to global Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade (FLEGT) achievements in 2017 under the Phase III programme. This year’s objectives were to increasingly operationalize the projects that were endorsed under the first two calls for proposals in the Voluntary Partnership Agreement (VPA) countries and ensure productive results from these projects that will have a positive effect on the VPA processes.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2010
Mozambique

For two reasons the miombo woodlands of eastern and southern Africa provide an important opportunity for developing pro-poor payments for avoided deforestation and degradation. Firstly, there is strong scientific evidence that the loss of woodlands is associated with a decline in livelihoods. Secondly, there are two decades of successful community-based natural resource management (CBNRM) in the miombo region.

Journal Articles & Books
March 2017
Mozambique

Agriculture is an important engine for economic growth in Africa, but effective agricultural strategies to support rural development and poverty alleviation are scarce. State investment in the small-scale farming sector is minimal and the entrepreneurial family farm sector remains underrepresented. Meanwhile, large-scale land investments are advocated as means to bring capital to rural areas and stimulate development.

Journal Articles & Books
November 2012
Mozambique

Understanding how land use and its changes affect forest cover and carbon stocks is fundamental to developing sound REDD+ delivery options. A study in Manica Province, a REDD+ pilot area for Mozambique, suggests biomass and forest carbon fell substantially between 2007 and 2010. The study combined radar remote sensing information (to measure changes in biomass and carbon stocks) with field investigations (to establish land use and land cover changes, and their causes). Small-scale agriculture is responsible for nearly half of the loss.

Reports & Research
June 2013
Mozambique

Mozambique is the 8th most vulnerable country to climate change and is one of the poorest countries in the world with a high dependency on foreign aid. The population is primarily rural and dependent on agriculture, with 60% living on the coastline. Droughts, flooding and cyclones affect particular regions of the country and these are projected to increase in frequency and severity.

Reports & Research
December 2014
Mozambique

Social Justice in Forestry – as a project of FGLG with funding from the EC – supported the Mozambique Forest Governance Learning Group (FGLG-Mozambique) from January 2009 to December 2013, building on a first phase of EC support from April 2005 to December 2008 and an even earlier phase of work funded by DFID that started in 2003-2004.

Reports & Research
August 2009
Mozambique

The implementation of the South–South REDD process was made achievable by those who assumed leadership roles (political and technical), facilitated the meetings and the logistics on the ground (especially the consultations and training) and acted as resources people. It would be impossible to name everyone, but in particular we would like to thank the Minister of Environment, Alcinda Abreu, and Vice-Minister, Ana Chichava, who provided the leadership and often challenged the technical experts.