environment

Reports & Research
December 2014
Mozambique

Social Justice in Forestry – as a project of FGLG with funding from the EC – supported the Mozambique Forest Governance Learning Group (FGLG-Mozambique) from January 2009 to December 2013, building on a first phase of EC support from April 2005 to December 2008 and an even earlier phase of work funded by DFID that started in 2003-2004.

Journal Articles & Books
May 2015
Mozambique

The loss of woodland in Mozambique is more than an environmental issue. Choices about land use — whether made locally, provincially or nationally — affect the availability of water, firewood, fertile land and other ‘ecosystem services’ delivered by woodlands. When these services underpin food security and routes out of poverty, what happens to woodlands becomes as much about people.

9 October 2017
Global

On September 18th, a successful and informative webinar to discuss land-related Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), co-hosted by the Columbia Center on Sustainable Development (CCSI), the Land Portal Foundation, UN SDSN’s Thematic Network on Good Governance of Extractive and Land Resources, the Global Land Tool Network (GLTN), and the Global Land Indicators Initiative (GLII), took place.  

Journal Articles & Books
December 2011
Ethiopia

This article provides evidence from one of the poorest countries in the world that the institutions of property rights matter for efficiency, investment, and growth. With all land state-owned, the threat of land redistribution never appears far off the agenda. Land rental and leasing have been made legal, but transfer rights remain restricted and the perception of continuing tenure insecurity remains quite strong. Using a unique panel data set, this study investigates whether transfer rights and implied tenure insecurity affect household investment decisions, focusing on trees and shrubs.

Reports & Research
Training Resources & Tools
December 2008

This strategic framework serves to guide and support the operational response of the World Bank Group (WBG) to new development challenges posed by global climate change. Unabated, climate change threatens to reverse hard-earned development gains. The poorest countries and communities will suffer the earliest and the most. Yet they depend on actions by other nations, developed and developing. While climate change is an added cost and risk to development, a well-designed and implemented global climate policy can also bring new economic opportunities to developing countries.

Reports & Research
Training Resources & Tools
December 2010

The world development report 2010 estimates that an additional $200 billion per year of climate-related financing is needed in developing countries between now and 2030 to keep global average temperature rise within 2 degrees Celsius. Developing countries face increased financing challenges over coming decades as they seek to pursue economic development along a lower emission trajectory.

Reports & Research
Training Resources & Tools
December 2017

Durban is located within a global biodiversity hotspot, and still contains a wealth of biodiversity. Some of this is protected in nature reserves, but much of it is in private hands or in communal lands on the city’s periphery. City managers are divided over the level of attention that should be given to preserving these remaining natural areas.

Reports & Research
Policy Papers & Briefs
August 2014
Senegal
Africa

Senegal is located in the Sahel region of West Africa. Between 1970 and 2000, the country suffered prolonged droughts that contributed to rural exodus. Communities in these peri-urban areas, already among the poorest in the country, are the most vulnerable to episodes of heavy rainfall and subsequent flooding. The impact of floods in this situation of uncontrolled urban growth is exacerbated by the lack of a functional storm water drainage system, ineffective land-use policies and non-compliance with the urban planning and development master plan.

Reports & Research
Training Resources & Tools
December 2012
Zambia
Africa

Agriculture and agribusiness play an important role in the Zambian economy, contributing around 20 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) in recent years and about 12 percent of national export earnings. Agriculture employs nearly 70 percent of the labor force and remains the main source of income and employment for most of the people living in rural areas. The objective of the Zambia agribusiness indicators (ABI) country report is to examine factors that have affected agricultural productivity, market access, and the policy environment for agriculture in Zambia.