eminent domain

The term derives from the state's position as having ultimate power over the land, which may reach the process of compulsory acquisition or expropriation of the land.

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Reports & Research
July 2015

Proceedings of 7th Eastern Africa Land Administration Network (EALAN) Annual General Meeting (AGM) and Workshop Theme:The State of Land Administration in Eastern African Countries: Comparative Overview Venue: Bahir Dar, Ethiopia Date: 21st – 22nd July 2015

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Journal Articles & Books
January 2015

Large scale land acquisition is a buzzword of the day in the world, more so in Ethiopia. The issue is indeed polarizing, in one hand it is dubbed as land grab and seen as ultimate scramble for land. On the other hand, it is often depicted as key to development, technology transfer and boost in productivity of an otherwise idle land available in Ethiopian lowlands, or somewhere else.

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Journal Articles & Books
July 2013

Gaining access to private lands in war-torn societies is a problem that confronts many governments, including Burundi when implementing public projects. Government officials hastily acquired private lands while implementing projects which are not always for public interests. Using the case study approach, the study explored what happened when land was acquired to erect a new Presidential Palace at Gasenyi area.

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Journal Articles & Books
July 2013

The right to Compensation for the compulsory acquisition of real property is constitutional and most enabling laws prescribe valuation methods to be adopted in determining the compensation payable. This paper aims at ascertaining the implications of the constitutional provisions and its impact on the compensation payable. It reviews some legislation, prescribed compensation rates and a valuation report on the Obite- Ubeta- Rumuekpe (OUR) pipeline acquisition and analyses the valuation method used.

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Peer-reviewed publication
December 2010

Rights-based conservation depends on institutions that give citizens clear and enforceable rights to manage lands and natural resources. Such rights hinge on citizens’ abilities to strengthen and defend their rights and on the operation of the rule of law and impersonal forms of government for legal reforms to take place and have meaning.

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Reports & Research
February 2011

This report provides an overview of the conflict in Loliondo, reviewing historical information, current land uses and tenure arrangements. 

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Reports & Research
December 2016

This report constitutes one of four countrywide assessments produced under the International Institute for Environment and Development’s (IIED) ‘Gender, land and accountability in the context of agricultural and other natural resource investments’ initiative. The goal of the initiative is to strengthen rural women’s livelihood opportunities by empowering them in relation to community land stewardship and increasing their ability to hold agricultural investors in East and West Africa to account. The main aim of this report is to provide a backdrop of relevant policies and practice.

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Reports & Research
April 2013

This fact finding mission had been organised to investigate the challenges facing pastoralists in Rufiji District, the challenges which have been defined as the source of conflict in this district. Although pastoralists had arrived in Rufiji since 1990’s but they officially went there and other places in Coastal and in Lindi Regions after they had been evicted from Ihefu and Kilosa in 2006-9. The Government, through their operation, announced to prepare areas for pastoralists and also to set all necessary and potential services for them to survive In Lindi, Ruvuma and Pwani Regions. 

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Reports & Research
August 2009

Over the Last three months, acts of unconceivable evil were perpetrated through an eviction operation against indigenous pastoralists in Loliondo. Loliondo is one of the three Divisions of the Ngorongoro District situated in the Arusha Region in Northern Tanzania. The Ngorongoro District Covers an area of about 14037 square Kilometres. Stretching across some 8,300 sq km, is the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, established in 1959 and governed by the Ngorongoro Conservation Area Authority, and the rest is the Loliondo Game Control Area consisting of the Sale and Loliondo Divisions.