customary tenure

Customary Tenure in Daw Taw Ku Village, Kayah State, Myanmar

The poster presents an overview of land, livelihoods and customary practices in Daw Taw Ku village, Kayah State, Myanmar. This poster is one of a five village case studies produced by partner organizations during field-based training on how to document customary tenure systems, supported by MRLG.

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February 2016

Customary Tenure in Nan-Pan Village, Southern Shan State, Myanmar

The poster presents an overview of land, livelihoods and customary practices in Nan-Pan Village, Southern Shan State, Myanmar. This poster is one of a five village case studies produced by partner organizations during field-based training on how to document customary tenure systems, supported by MRLG. 

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February 2016

Customary Tenure in Myat Latt Village, Magwe Division, Myanmar

The poster presents an overview of land, livelihoods and customary practices in Myan Latt Village, Magwe Divsion, Myanmar. This poster is one of a five village case studies produced by partner organizations during field-based training on how to document customary tenure systems, supported by MRLG.

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February 2016

Customary Tenure in Man-Hsat Village, Northern Shan State, Myanmar

The poster presents an overview of land, livelihoods and customary practices in Man-hsat Village, Northern Shan State, Myanmar. This poster is one of a five village case studies produced by partner organizations during field-based training on how to document customary tenure systems, supported by MRLG.

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February 2016

Customary Tenure in Myanmar

This video is based on the combined efforts of 5 civil society organizations and ethnic youth organizations (88 Generation, Point, FLU, KYO&TSYU) to document local Customary Tenure practices in different villages throughout the country, in the states of Shan North, Shan South, Magwe and Kayah, with the support of MRLG. It’s explains how they implemented the documentation of Customary Tenure practices. The video also explains what customary tenure is, based on the local communities point of view and practices, and why CT recognition is important to them.

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March 2016

Innovative Approach to Land Conflict Transformation: Lessons Learned From the HAGL/Indigenous Communities’ Mediation Process in Ratanakiri, Cambodia

In the Mekong region, conflicts between local communities and large scale land concessions are widespread. They are often difficult to solve. In Cambodia, an innovative approach to conflict resolution was tested in a case involving a private company, Hoang Anh Gia Lai (HAGL), and several indigenous communities who lost some of their customary lands and forests when the company obtained a concession to grow rubber in the Province of Ratanakiri. The approach was developed by CSOs Equitable Cambodia (EC) and Inclusive Development International (IDI) with the support of QDF funding from MRLG.

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July 2016

The Recognition and Security of Customary Tenure of Indigenous Peoples in Cambodia: a Legal Perspective

This short thematic study challenges the assumption that the legal framework to recognize and protect indigenous peoples’ (IP) customary lands is adequate and that the challenge lies in its implementation. With support from MRLG, a core group of IP NGOs of the Cambodia Indigenous Peoples Alliance (CIPA) held a series of seminars to scrutinize this legal framework, identify gaps and make recommendations for a revision of the supporting legal framework. The thematic study documents this joint reflection.

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November 2016

The Recognition of Customary Tenure in Myanmar

This thematic study presents an analysis of customary tenure arrangements in Myanmar and identifies key challenges and opportunities for strengthening the recognition of customary tenure in the country. Drawing on examples from various regions and states, the study highlights key features of customary tenure systems, which vary depending on history, geography, resource base, ethnicity and social organization. It shows that customary tenure includes both communal land and private plots claimed by individuals or households, such as paddy land or permanent upland crops.

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November 2016

The Recognition and Security of Customary Tenure of Indigenous Peoples in Cambodia: a Legal Perspective (in Khmer)

This short thematic study challenges the assumption that the legal framework to recognize and protect indigenous peoples’ (IP) customary lands is adequate and that the challenge lies in its implementation. With support from MRLG, a core group of IP NGOs of the Cambodia Indigenous Peoples Alliance (CIPA) held a series of seminars to scrutinize this legal framework, identify gaps and make recommendations for a revision of the supporting legal framework. The thematic study documents this joint reflection.

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November 2016