Dominican Republic

ISO3
DOM

Dominican Republic

English

The Dominican Republic is a middle-income country with a primarily service-based economy. The country has a high urbanization rate and suffers from land degradation. Poverty is widespread in the country, particularly in those communities located on the border with Haiti.

The Constitution of the Dominican Republic of 2010 grants the right to property. It states that land must be used for useful purposes and it calls for the integration of rural people in the national development process. The Real Property Registry Law of 2005 established the procedures and institutions for the adjudication and registration of property rights, further specifying the functions of the Supreme Court for the administration of land. The 2000 Dominican Republic Environmental and Natural Resource Law sets the principles for the implementation of development plans.

Disputes over land are generally due to competing claims based on title documents, occupation of land, land invasion and issues related to land seizures. These disputes contribute to the persistence of tenure insecurity. Claims over land are usually resolved by the Land Courts, which have demonstrated a high level of efficiency in resolving land disputes. 

WTO Kills Farmers: Beyond the Hong Kong Ministerial

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The World Trade Organization (WTO) hailed the recent Hong Kong Sixth Ministerial Meeting last December 2005 as a positive movement towards the conclusion of the Doha Development Round. The round was supposedly geared towards ensuring that trade contributes to the development objectives of least developed and developing countries.

Resource information

February 2006
Publisher(s)
Asian Farmers' Association
Asian Partnership for the Development of Human Resources in Rural Asia

SP/SSM

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A Special Product (SP) is an agricultural product “out of the WTO” in that they are not subject to tariff reductions, i. e. Countries can keep the right to maintain protective tariffs on certain agricultural products that are essential for food security, rural development, and farmers’ livelihoods. The G33 proposal is for 10% of developing country products to be exempt from tariff reductions, with an additional 10% of product lines to have limited tariff reductions. This would be somewhere in the range of 300 products. The US counter-proposal is for a mere 5 products!

Resource information

May 2007
Publisher(s)
Asian Farmers' Association
Asian Partnership for the Development of Human Resources in Rural Asia

A Review of Gender Issues in the Dominican Republic, Haiti and Jamaica

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This report examines the effect of
gender on socio-economic outcomes in three Caribbean
countries: the Dominican Republic, Haiti and Jamaica.
Organized in three separate country notes, it covers:
demographics, health and reproductive health, violence,
education, labor and agriculture. The report is part of a
large effort aimed at establishing a strategic social agenda
in the region. Many of the key economic issues that

Resource information

August 2013
Publisher(s)
World Bank Group

Dominican Republic - Poverty Assessment : Poverty in a High-Growth Economy, 1986-2000, Volume 1. Main Report

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Since its recovery of macroeconomic
stability in 1991, the Dominican Republic has experienced a
period of notable economic growth. Poverty has declined in
the 1990s. Nevertheless, a segment of the population-mainly
in rural areas-does not seem to have benefited from this
growth. Poverty in this country in 1998 is less than that of
other countries if one adjusts for the level of economic
development. The principal poverty characteristics are the

Resource information

August 2013
Publisher(s)
World Bank Group

Export Commodity Production and Broad-Based Rural Development: Coffee and Cocoa in the Dominican Republic

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An estimated 80,000-100,000 Dominican
farmers produce coffee and cocoa, nearly 40 percent of all
agricultural producers. The sectors also provide employment
for tens of thousands of field laborers and persons employed
in linked economic activities. The majority of coffee and
cocoa producers are small-scale and most are located in
environmentally sensitive watersheds. Recent trends in
international commodity markets have challenged the survival

Resource information

June 2013
Publisher(s)
World Bank Group

Dominican Republic - Poverty Assessment : Poverty in a High-Growth Economy, 1986-2000, Volume 2. Background Papers

Also available in

Since its recovery of macroeconomic
stability in 1991, the Dominican Republic has experienced a
period of notable economic growth. Poverty has declined in
the 1990s. Nevertheless, a segment of the population-mainly
in rural areas-does not seem to have benefited from this
growth. Poverty in this country in 1998 is less than that of
other countries if one adjusts for the level of economic
development. The principal poverty characteristics are the

Resource information

August 2013
Publisher(s)
World Bank Group

Dominican Republic - Environmental Priorities and Strategic Options : Country Environmental Analysis

Also available in

This report discusses the affects of
rapid economic growth and increased urbanization on the
environmental quality of the Dominican Republic's
natural resource base (e.g., water resources
management--water quality, quantity and watershed management
and solid waste collection and disposal have become major
environmental concerns). It notes that the lack of
systematic data limits an accurate and detailed assessment

Resource information

September 2013
Publisher(s)
World Bank Group