Burkina Faso

BFA
Reports & Research
Burkina Faso
Africa
Western Africa

This Working Paper summarizes research conducted as part of the AgWater Solutions Project in Burkina Faso between 2009 and 2012. Researchers from the AgWater Solutions Project examined the potential for small reservoirs, inland valley cultivation and the use of motorized pumps. The main findings indicate that (1) Small reservoirs need better management at all stages to reduce costs and improve equity.Costs could be comparable with other AWM options. The total investment to reach 50% of the potential demand in Burkina Faso could be as much as USD 1,136 million.

Reports & Research
October 2011
Bangladesh
Burkina Faso
Chad
Chile
Colombia
Ecuador
Ethiopia
Ghana
India
Kenya
Laos
Nepal
Peru
South Africa
Thailand
Vietnam
Zimbabwe
South-Eastern Asia
Eastern Africa
Southern Asia
Southern Africa
South America
Western Africa

Despite challenges in many river

basins, overall the planet has

enough water to meet the full range

of peoples’ and ecosystems’ needs

for the foreseeable future, but

equity will only be achieved through

judicious and creative management.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2013
Morocco
Senegal
Ghana
Algeria
Burkina Faso
Egypt
Africa

When discussing water and sanitation issues, technology is often seen as the key element by many stakeholders. Within a multinational project, the opportunity was taken to analyse the experiences with the existing water infrastructure to look behind this assumption and - if not working satisfactory - to identify the key requirements that obviously have not been met. Following this, it should be possible to prepare a set of requirements to learn from this.

Reports & Research
December 2010
Burkina Faso
Ghana
Western Africa

This paper apples the principle of west –use accounts, developed in the first of the series, to the Volta River in West Africa. The Volta Basin covers six countries, with 85% of its area in Ghana and Burkina Faso.

Runoff in all three tributaries increases from 2-7% in the drier north to 12-26 % in the higher – rainfall south. Grassland is the dominant land use throughout Basin ranging from 76% of the Delta catchment in the south to 98% of the Arly catchment with corresponding water use of 55% and 92% of water used in each.

Reports & Research
December 2010
Burkina Faso
Ghana
Western Africa

This paper applies the principles of water-use accounts, developed in the first of the series, to the Nile River basin in Northeast Africa. The Nile and its tributaries flow though nine countries. The White Nile flows though Uganda, Sudan, and Egypt. The Blue Nile starts in Ethiopia. Zaire, Kenya, Tanzanian, Rwanda, and Burundi all have tributaries, which flow into the Nile or into Lake Victoria.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2012
Ghana
Burkina Faso
Niger
Africa
Sub-Saharan Africa

Strategies for increasing the development and use of groundwater for agriculture over much of Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are urgently needed. Expansion of small-scale groundwater irrigation offers an attractive option to smallholder farmers to overcome unreliable wet-season rainfall and enhance dry-season production.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2012
Ghana
Burkina Faso
Niger
Western Africa

Strategies for increasing the development and use of groundwater for agriculture over much of Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are urgently needed. Expansion of small-scale groundwater irrigation offers an attractive option to smallholder farmers to overcome unreliable wet-season rainfall and enhance dry-season production.

Reports & Research
January 2010
Burkina Faso
Ghana
Mozambique
South Africa
South-Eastern Asia
Africa

Most African countries underwent water legislation reform since the 1990s, through

which existing plural legal systems were changed into nation-wide permit systems, in

which the state acts as custodian of the nation’s water resources. Although globally

heralded as the best way to manage water resources within the broader context of

Integrated Water Resource Management, this project examines the problematic

implications of the new laws for the majority of the rural and peri-urban poor. Since time