Austria

ISO3
AUT
Date of publication
June 2014
Geographical focus

This economy profile presents the Doing
Business indicators for Austria. In a series of annual
reports, Doing Business assesses regulations affecting
domestic firms in 189 economies and ranks the economies in
10 areas of business regulation, such as starting a
business, resolving insolvency and trading across borders.
This year's report data cover regulations measured from
June 2012 through May 2013. The report is the 11th edition
of the Doing Business series.

Date of publication
June 2016
Geographical focus

The purpose of this report on corporate
financial reporting in Austria is to describe the key
features of Austria’s corporate financial reporting
environment as well as its practical application in regard
to small and medium enterprises (SMEs’) financial reporting
practices in Austria. This report builds on the World Bank
accounting and auditing reports on standards and codes
(ROSC) methodology to give an overview of the Austrian
corporate financial reporting system. It selectively
provides good practice examples that can give incentives to
overcome impediments to financial reporting reform. Based on
the findings of two surveys conducted among Austrian SMEs
and Austrian financial institutions, the report focuses
particularly on aspects relevant to SME financial reporting.
This report forms part of the activities of the center for
financial reporting reform (CFRR) within the road to Europe
program of accounting reform and institutional strengthening
(REPARIS), which also provided funding.

Date of publication
January 2012
Geographical focus

Tenure rights over land, forest, and carbon have become a contentious issue within REDD+ implementation across the tropics because local communities could be excluded from REDD+ benefits if land tenure or use and access rights are not clear. This study aims to understand and assess tenure arrangements under the fi rst REDD+ demonstration project in Cambodia, the Oddar Meanchey Community Forestry REDD+ Project. In particular, the study explores the following questions: (1) How are tenure rights arranged in the Oddar Meanchey REDD+ Project? (2) Does the tenure regime recognise the rights of local communities to their land and its associated resources? (3) What kind of institutions are put in place to support tenure rights of local communities in the project?

Geographical focus

The purpose of the present Act is the economic and expedient use of the soil; the protection and care of the environment and, in particular the conservation or reinstatement of the sustainable purity of the air, water and soil, as well as the avoidance of noise; the conservation or reinstatement of a healthy nature, the protection of the indigenous fauna and flora and their natural living spaces, of the cultural heritage and, finally, in particular that of housing and recreational areas. The text consists of 69 articles divided into 5 Parts as follows: Subdivision of land (I); Unification of land (II);Consolidation of land (III); Change of boundaries (IV); Penalties, transitional and final provisions (V).

Geographical focus

The present Ordinance enforces the Burgenland Building Law (LGBl. No. 10/1998). In particular, the Ordinance lays down provisions relating to building technology and building equipment, as well as to special environmental, health and energy requirements of buildings. Furthermore, the Ordinance also applies to parcel of lands and other constructions and facilities subject to requirements of the present Ordinance. The text consists of 43 articles divided into9 Parts as follows: Mechanical resistance and stability (1); Fire protection (2); Hygiene, health and environment protection (3); Safety in use and freedom from barriers (4); Sound insulation (5); Energy saving and heat insulation (6); Guidelines and exceptions (7); Special provisions (8); Final provisions (9). Eight Annexes are enclosed.

Geographical focus

The purpose of the present Act is the economic and expedient use of the soil; the protection and care of the environment and, in particular the conservation or reinstatement of the sustainable purity of the air, water and soil, as well as the avoidance of noise; the conservation or reinstatement of a healthy nature, the protection of the indigenous fauna and flora and their natural living spaces, of the cultural heritage and, finally, in particular that of housing and recreational areas. The text consists of 69 articles divided into 5 Parts as follows: Subdivision of land (I); Unification of land (II);Consolidation of land (III); Change of boundaries (IV); Penalties, transitional and final provisions (V).

Date of publication
July 2014
Geographical focus

The present Law introduces some amendments to the Styria Land Use Planning Law 2010 (LGBl. No. 49). In particular, article 42a on «Newly created municipalities» is added. According to article 21 and 25 of the afore-mentioned Act these municipalities have to prepare a Local Development Plan and a Planning Scheme. Furthermore, article 67b on “Transitional provisions” is added. This article establishes procedures to be followed for the amendments of the afore-mentioned Local Development Plan and Planning Scheme.

Date of publication
May 2015
Geographical focus

The present Ordinance introduces some amendments to the Burgenland Building Ordinance 2008 (LGBl. No. 63/2008). In particular, the Ordinance amends, inter alia, article 42 on «Implementation Notes and Information Procedure» establishing that with the present Ordinance the Commission Directive 2010/91/EU amending Council Directive 91/414/EEC to include metosulam as active substance and amending Decision 2008/934/EC of 10 December 2010 is implemented.

Date of publication
March 2014

USAID Land Tenure and Property Rights Division Chief Dr. Gregory Myers's Remarks from Partners’ Support to the Voluntary Guidelines & Land Governance: Exploiting Synergies & Measuring Impact. Remarks posted as written.
Madam Chair (Rachael Turner), thank you for the opportunity to speak today. On behalf of the United States, I would like to thank the U.K. Department for International Development for their excellent leadership as the inaugural Chair of the Global Donor Working Group on Land. We look forward to working with the incoming Chair of the Working Group—the Government of Germany.
I am here to introduce a new initiative: a comprehensive database and map of land governance programs that are funded by members of the Global Donor Working Group on Land. As we have heard, The Global Donor Working Group was officially launched last year to promote greater coordination on land and resource governance.
One of the primary goals of this group is to support implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines for the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries, and Forests in the Context of National Food Security. From 2011 to 2012, I had the honor to Chair the negotiations of these Guidelines. Some of you in this room were part of those negotiations and know the efforts required to produce an agreement that was endorsed unanimously by 96 member countries, civil society and the private sector.
While the development and endorsement of the Voluntary Guidelines was an important achievement, their ultimate value will be determined by their implementation and measured in improved development outcomes for women, men and children around the globe. Delivering on this ambitious agenda in countries across the developing world will require coordinated action by donors and development agencies, civil society organizations, governments and the private sector.
In order for the Global Donor Working Group to identify opportunities for synergy and achieve greater coordination, we had to first develop a clear understanding of who is doing “what - where” in the land sector. To that end, the United States worked with the Global Donor Platform and members of the Global Donor Working Group on Land to lead a data collection and visualization initiative on the land and resource governance programs from 16 bi-lateral and multi-lateral donors and development agencies, including the development agencies from Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Germany, the European Commission, France, Japan, the Netherlands, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom, as well as the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations, the International Fund for Agricultural Development, and the World Bank.
The result of these efforts - negotiated through the Global Donor Working Group on Land - is a database of approximately 231 active programs in 103 countries with a total value of approximately $2.9 billion. The database contains information on the location, duration, funding, and scope of each program, as well as information on what specific aspects of the Voluntary Guidelines are addressed by each program’s activities. The database also allows donors to include links to supplemental resources, such as reports or program websites, and points of contact for each program.
An interactive map of the information in the database clearly displays where different donors and development agencies are working and what they are working on with respect to land and resource governance. This information can help us and other stakeholders better coordinate these programs and leverage our collective resources for maximum impact. As we have heard throughout this session, better communication and coordination among development partners can help us avoid unnecessary duplication, share lessons learned, leverage limited resources and most importantly amplify the impact of our development efforts.
While this initiative is an important step in the right direction, it is only one step. Our next endeavor could be to consider how we link this data to other sources of information: such as demand for land tenure reform, and/or capacity to address land tenure challenges, or with data sets illustrating the locations of large-scale land transactions or overlapping land use rights. Several data sets like this already exist, however, these data systems often use different standards and are incompatible with each other. One vital task we should consider is how to develop common data standards and shared platforms for all types of land and resources rights data and tools. If we do this, we may more fully realize the benefits of the Voluntary Guidelines, resulting in more robust economic growth, better food security and nutrition, and reduced conflict.

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