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Land Deals in Kenya: The Genesis of Land Deals in Kenya and its Implication on Pastoral Livelihoods

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In Laikipia the key dynamics centre on absentee land, much of this being land that was divvied out to Kikuyu by Kenyatta after independence. Much of this land (particularly north of the 600mm rainfall band) is not viable for cultivation. However, it was used by the Kikuyu title-holders as collateral to acquire loans with the Agricultural Development Corporation and others. Maasai, Samburu and Pokot herders have been grazing this land since the 1970s.

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January 2011

Diversification, Experimentation, and Adaptation: Pastoralists in Communal Governance of Resources and Livelihoods Strategies

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This paper presents a discussion of the communal tenure system in Olkiramatian, a group ranch in the southern rangelands of Kenya which has granted the residents the flexibility and choice to pursue diversification alternatives that demand open landscapes.

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January 2011

Koija Starbeds Ecolodge: A Case Study of a Conservation Enterprise in Kenya.

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Conservation enterprises are commercial activities designed to create benefit flows that support a conservation objective. The Koija ‘Starbeds’ Ecolodge was created jointly by a community group, a private sector partner and the African Wildlife Foundation (AWF) to help protect a critical wildlife corridor and habitat along the Ewaso Nyiro River in the Samburu Heartland (www.awf.org). Many conservation enterprises claim success mainly based on their noble intentions,

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January 2007

Conservation outside of parks: Attitudes of local communities in Laikipia, Kenya

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Between 1999 and 2002, interviews were conducted in Laikipia District to examine whether pastoralists also experience conflict, and to determine whether wildlife conservation provided appreciable benefits to residents, or fostered pro-conservation attitudes

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January 2006

Integrating Pastoralist Livelihoods and Wildlife Conservation?

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This report provides an overview of land use conflicts in Loliondo. According to the Village Land Act No. 5 1999, all land in Loliondo is classified as Village Land. However, there is spatial overlap of Village Lands and a Game Controlled Areas. Prior to 2009 GCAs had not bearing on land use or management; however the 2009 Wildlife Conservation Act prohibits farming and livestock grazing in GCA. This new Act poses a huge problem to pastoral commuinities. An economic summary provides a better understanding of initial revenue that could be generated from Loliondo.

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January 2011

Natural Conservationists? Evaluating the Impact of Pastoralist Land Use Practices on Tanzania's Wildlife Economy

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The land management practices of pastoralist Maasai communities have a major bearing on landscapes and wildlife habitats in northern Tanzania. Pastoralists manage lands according to locally devised rules designed to manage and conserve key resources such as pastures and water sources. Dry season grazing reserves are an important part of traditional land management systems in many pastoralist communities, providing a ‘grass bank’ for livestock to consume during the long dry season when forage invariably becomes scarce and domestic animals are stressed for water and nutrients.

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January 2009

Emergent or illusory? Community wildlife management in Tanzania.

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As with natural resource management reform processes elsewhere in East Africa, Tanzanian CWM has become highly contested terrain, both physically and conceptually. The linear, centrally-led, devolutionary reform processes that were conceptualised by donor and NGO supporters of CWM in the mid-1990s have not materialised. Rather, multi-faceted political and institutional conflicts over the control of valuable land and wildlife resources characterise CWM in Tanzania today.

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January 2007

Ecotourism in Northern Kenya Policy Brief

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This policy brief focuses on ecotourism in north-eastern Kenya and is based on the analysis of two key existing ecotourism industry models in Laikipia and Isiolo. The purpose of the work was to provide the Government of Kenya (GoK) policymakers and private sector investors with a deeper understanding of the eco-tourism industry already established in the region. As highlighted, the study is based on two different ecotourism models (and four enterprises) in pro-pastoral communities in Laikipia and Isiolo using a framework of common qualitative measures of analysis.

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January 2009

A Study on the Impact of National Policies, Processes on Pastoralism in Tanzania

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Pastoralism has suffered untold abuses in the implementation of national policy and laws before in the incorporation of bills of rights in the constitution. These provisions allowed freedom of association that enable formation of CSOs and NGOs, some of which based their interventions into policies and legal issues that denied pastoralists of the rights to engage into livelihood processes through access to, management of, and benefit from land and resources entailed in them.

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January 2007