Tanzania

TZA
Reports & Research
Policy Papers & Briefs
August 2017
Tanzania
Africa

This paper investigates the presence of endogenous peer effects in the adoption of formal property rights. Using data from a unique land titling experiment held in an unplanned settlement in Dar es Salaam, the analysis finds a strong, positive impact of neighbor adoption on the household's choice to purchase a land title. The paper also shows that this relationship holds in a separate, identical experiment held a year later in a nearby community, as well as in administrative data for more than 160,000 land parcels in the same city.

Reports & Research
Training Resources & Tools
December 2011
Tanzania
Africa

Tanzania's land, local government and forest laws mean that rural communities have well defined rights to own, manage and benefit from forest and woodland resources within their local areas through the establishment of village forests. This approach, known by practitioners as Community Based Forest Management (CBFM) results in the legal establishment of village land forest reserves, community forest reserves or private forests. By 2008, 1,460 villages on mainland Tanzania1 were involved in establishing or managing village forests covering a total of over 2.345 million hectares.

Reports & Research
Training Resources & Tools
April 2016
Tanzania
Africa

The city of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania has undergone a period of unprecedented urbanization that has contributed to the degradation of the city’s natural environment. With a growth rate above or near 5% for the past three decades, it is the fastest growing city in East Africa. The arrival of thousands of in-migrants year after year has overwhelmed the city’s ability to deliver adequate public services, housing and jobs. Unplanned, densely populated informal settlements that lack basic water, sewer, and waste services now cover much of the city’s land area.

Reports & Research
Training Resources & Tools
November 2012
Tanzania
Africa

Agriculture in Tanzania accounts for 28 percent of the country's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and employs 80 percent of its labor force. The sector is also an important source of export revenues. The data and findings presented in this report provide a summary of the performance of the agriculture sector in Tanzania using a set of indicators covering six areas.

Reports & Research
Training Resources & Tools
October 2012
Kenya
Zambia
Uganda
Zimbabwe
Tanzania
Malawi
Niger
Sub-Saharan Africa
Western Africa
Africa
Eastern Africa
Southern Africa

Africa's growing demand for food has been met increasingly by imports from the global market. This, coupled with rising global food prices, brings ever-mounting food import bills. In addition, population growth and changing demand patterns will double demands over the next 10 years. Two key issues must be addressed: (a) establishing a consistent and stable policy environment for regional trade in fertilizers; and (b) investing in institutions that reduce the transaction costs of coordination failures.

Reports & Research
Training Resources & Tools
December 2007
Tanzania
Africa

The Government of Tanzania is committed to supporting women entrepreneurs with both policy and practical support. The Government of Tanzania has made impressive strides in supporting women entrepreneurs, and its policies reflect a commitment to advancing women. The Ministry of Industry, Trade, and Marketing, which commissioned this report, has established special initiatives to reach out to women, and government supported organizations such as the Small Industries Development Organization (SIDO) have been working to empower women entrepreneurs through training and access to credit.

Reports & Research
Policy Papers & Briefs
December 2016
Rwanda
Kenya
Tanzania
Senegal
Ethiopia
Sub-Saharan Africa
Africa

This paper illustrates how the capabilities of GIS and satellite imagery can be harnessed to explore and better understand the urban form of several large African cities (Addis Ababa, Nairobi, Kigali, Dar es Salaam, and Dakar). To allow for comparability across very diverse cities, this work looks at the above mentioned cities through the lens of several spatial indicators and relies heavily on data derived from satellite imagery.

Reports & Research
Policy Papers & Briefs
December 2015
Tanzania
Malawi
Uganda
Africa
Eastern Africa

In sub-Saharan Africa women comprise a large proportion of the agricultural labor force, yet they are consistently found to be less productive than male farmers. The gender gap in agricultural productivity-measured by the value of agricultural produce per unit of cultivated land-ranges from 4-25 percent, depending on the country and the crop.1 The World Bank Africa Gender Innovation Lab, UN Women, and the UNDP-UNEP Poverty-Environment Initiative jointly produced a report to quantify the cost of the gender gap and the potential gains from closing that gap in Malawi, Tanzania, and Uganda.