Acronym
WB

The World Bank is a vital source of financial and technical assistance to developing countries around the world. We are not a bank in the ordinary sense but a unique partnership to reduce poverty and support development. The World Bank Group has two ambitious goals: End extreme poverty within a generation and boost shared prosperity.

  • To end extreme poverty, the Bank's goal is to decrease the percentage of people living on less than $1.25 a day to no more than 3% by 2030.
  • To promote shared prosperity, the goal is to promote income growth of the bottom 40% of the population in each country.

The World Bank Group comprises five institutions managed by their member countries.

The World Bank Group and Land: Working to protect the rights of existing land users and to help secure benefits for smallholder farmers

The World Bank (IBRD and IDA) interacts primarily with governments to increase agricultural productivity, strengthen land tenure policies and improve land governance. More than 90% of the World Bank’s agriculture portfolio focuses on the productivity and access to markets by small holder farmers. Ten percent of our projects focus on the governance of land tenure.

Similarly, investments by the International Finance Corporation (IFC), the World Bank Group’s private sector arm, including those in larger scale enterprises, overwhelmingly support smallholder farmers through improved access to finance, inputs and markets, and as direct suppliers. IFC invests in environmentally and socially sustainable private enterprises in all parts of the value chain (inputs such as irrigation and fertilizers, primary production, processing, transport and storage, traders, and risk management facilities including weather/crop insurance, warehouse financing, etc

For more information, visit the World Bank Group and land and food security (http://go.worldbank.org/S0D96SZZT0)

World Bank Group Resources

Displaying 81 - 90 of 4578
Reports & Research
Policy Papers & Briefs
December 2016
China
Africa
Sub-Saharan Africa

Agriculture has been essentially the backbone of economic growth for centuries. The sector has provided employment for the majority of the world population for generations, and has served as a powerful force in transforming of economies towards an industry- and service- based. In many countries, through both productivity increases and farm land expansion, agriculture contributed to the transformation by releasing labor force for the other parts of the economy, providing food security, keeping wage down by providing low cost food, and generating foreign exchange.

Reports & Research
Training Resources & Tools
December 2016
Guatemala
Latin America and the Caribbean

This Systematic Country Diagnostic (SCD) looks at why a country with such great potential has not been able to materialize it. The SCD analysis has identified several knowledge gaps. The analysis in this report focuses on the 2000 to 2014 period, covering the boom years before 2008 and the global financial crisis and recovery years up to 2014. It is based on a rich household data set from the National Living Standards Measurement Survey (ENCOVI) as well as on data on malnutrition from the 2014 National Survey of Maternal and Child Indicators (ENSMI).

Reports & Research
Training Resources & Tools
December 2016
Nepal
Southern Asia

Agriculture contributes about 35 percent to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of Nepal. But growth in the sector has been quite volatile in the last decade, tothe extent that the lowest and highest growth rates were recorded in consecutive years. Nepal agriculture is characterized by relatively low yields compared to neighboring countries. Furthermore,land is disproportionately allocated to grain staples (rice, maize, wheat, millet, barley, and buckwheat),despite fruits and vegetables showing relatively higher yields and higher growth in consumption.

Reports & Research
Training Resources & Tools
November 2016
Eastern Europe
Europe
Central Asia

Today, nearly half of youth in the six South East European countries (SEE6) are not in the labor market, and one quarter is inactive—not in employment, education, or training. These poor outcomes partly reflect a difficult recovery in SEE6 from the 2008 global financial crisis, which sent already high youth unemployment soaring to new heights. This paper presents 10 evidence-based messages on the youth employment challenges in SEE6. The 10 messages demonstrate that many factors disproportionately affect jobless youth.

Reports & Research
Training Resources & Tools
November 2016
Eastern Europe
Europe
Central Asia

Today, nearly half of youth in the six South East European countries (SEE6) are not in the labor market, and one quarter is inactive—not in employment, education, or training. These poor outcomes partly reflect a difficult recovery in SEE6 from the 2008 global financial crisis, which sent already high youth unemployment soaring to new heights. This paper presents 10 evidence-based messages on the youth employment challenges in SEE6. The 10 messages demonstrate that many factors disproportionately affect jobless youth.

Reports & Research
Journal Articles & Books
November 2016
Algeria
Burkina Faso
Nigeria
Mauritania
Mali
Ethiopia
Eritrea
Cameroon
South Sudan
Central African Republic
Senegal
Chad
Niger
Sudan
Sub-Saharan Africa
Africa

Prospects for Livestock-Based Livelihoods in Africa’s Drylands examines the challenges and opportunities facing the livestock sector and the people who depend on livestock in the dryland regions of Sub-Saharan Africa.

Reports & Research
Policy Papers & Briefs
October 2016
Kenya
Ethiopia
Democratic Republic of the Congo
Nepal

The Inspection Panel was created in 1993 by the Board of Executive Directors of the World Bank to receive complaints submitted by people suffering harm allegedly caused by World Bank projects. This experience provides important lessons for both the Bank and for the global development community at large. The Panel therefore launched this series of publications to draw the main emerging lessons from its caseload.

Reports & Research
Journal Articles & Books
October 2016

South Asia’s trade almost doubled in the past decade, but the share of trade in GDP is still smaller (47 percent) than in East Asia (55 percent), and South Asia’s economic competitiveness continues to lag that of other regions. Part of the problem is the region’s container ports. As a result of inefficiencies, the average cost of exporting or importing a container in the region is more than twice what it is in East Asia. Better port logistics could help increase trade, diversify exports, attract more foreign direct investment, and spur economic growth.

Reports & Research
Journal Articles & Books
October 2016
Nigeria
Uganda
Tanzania
Ethiopia
Niger
Malawi
Sub-Saharan Africa
Africa

While scholars long recognized the importance of land markets as a key driver of rural non-farm development and transformation in rural areas, evidence on the extent of their operation and the nature of participants remains limited. We use household data from 6 countries to show that there is great potential for such markets to increase productivity and equalize factor ratios. While rental markets transfer land to land-poor and labor-rich producers, their operation and thus impact may be constrained by policy restrictions.

Reports & Research
Journal Articles & Books
October 2016
Nigeria
Uganda
Tanzania
Ethiopia
Niger
Malawi
Sub-Saharan Africa
Africa

The contribution of women to labor in African agriculture is regularly quoted in the range of 60–80%. Using individual, plot-level labor input data from nationally representative household surveys across six Sub-Saharan African countries, this study estimates the average female labor share in crop production at 40%. It is slightly above 50% in Malawi, Tanzania, and Uganda, and substantially lower in Nigeria (37%), Ethiopia (29%), and Niger (24%).