Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)

Mission

The mission of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is to promote policies that will improve the economic and social well-being of people around the world.

The OECD provides a forum in which governments can work together to share experiences and seek solutions to common problems. We work with governments to understand what drives economic, social and environmental change. We measure productivity and global flows of trade and investment. We analyse and compare data to predict future trends. We set international standards on a wide range of things, from agriculture and tax to the safety of chemicals.

We also look at issues that directly affect everyone’s daily life, like how much people pay in taxes and social security, and how much leisure time they can take. We compare how different countries’ school systems are readying their young people for modern life, and how different countries’ pension systems will look after their citizens in old age.

The OECD’s core values

  • Objective: Our analyses and recommendations are independent and evidence-based.
  • Open: We encourage debate and a shared understanding of critical global issues.
  • Bold: We dare to challenge conventional wisdom starting with our own.
  • Pioneering: We identify and address emerging and long term challenges.
  • Ethical: Our credibility is built on trust, integrity and transparency.
OECD

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Resources

Displaying 1 - 4 of 4
November 2015

This reports focus is making global
value chains (GVCs) more inclusive. This is achieved by
overcoming participation constraints for Small and Medium
Enterprises (SMEs) and facilitation access for Low Income
Developing Countries (LIDCs).The two major points of this
report are 1) participation in GVCs is heterogeneous and
uneven, across and within countries and 2) available data
and survey-based evidence suggest that SME participation in

Policy Papers & Briefs
January 2004

This paper looks at the dynamics of land and violent conflict. It states that conflict situations in rural societies deeply affect the politics of land, and that land requires a careful approach by policy makers because it is a central element in the evolution of societies. As a result, policies pertaining to land are not neutral in terms of conflict management.The paper argues that donors seeking to promote peace and development should tackle land issues in recipient countries more systematically, more carefully and in a more coherent manner.