Amerindian Peoples’ Association

The Amerindian Peoples Association (APA) is a non-governmental Indigenous Peoples organisation in Guyana. It is primarily an advocacy organisation that seeks to promote and defend the rights of the Indigenous Peoples of Guyana. 

Membership of the APA is made up of Units throughout the country, currently amounting to close to eighty such units. The Association is led by an Executive Committee comprising the President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, Assistant Secretary/Treasurer, thirteen regional representatives, a women’s representative and a youth representative. 

The APA has a central office in Georgetown which is staffed by persons from interior communities who carry out the daily functions of the organisation and who provide the link between what is happening in the communities and at the national and international levels.

Goals and Objectives 

The objectives of the APA are to promote the social, economic, political and cultural development of Amerindian communities in solidarity with each other and to promote and defend their rights.

The long term goal of the APA is to secure legislative and policy changes to protect indigenous rights in all instances, to promote representation of indigenous peoples by indigenous peoples themselves, to provide information to indigenous communities about their rights under national and international law, to promote the sustainable use of the natural resources by indigenous peoples and to ensure the protection of the environment, to secure participation in development activities and decision making processes that affect the lives of the indigenous peoples of Guyana, and to ensure that the state fulfills its obligations in providing basic services to indigenous communities such as health, education, transportation and communication services.

Acronym
APA

Location

Guyana
GY

Amerindian Peoples’ Association Resources

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Reports & Research
September 2016

Based on the experiences of Amerindian communities in Guyana, this briefing presents some of the main causes of forest conflicts in the country as well as recommendations for how to address these. In particular, the document presents the following points: 

• Lack of full recognition of indigenous peoples’ land rights in line with international law, absence of effective FPIC procedures and limited transparency in forest governance are key underlying causes of forest-related conflicts in Guyana;