Focal point
tdeo@ulaug.org

The Uganda Land Alliance (ULA) is a membership consortium of national, regional and international civil society organizations and individuals, lobbying and advocating for fair land laws and policies that address the land rights of the poor, disadvantaged and vulnerable groups and individuals in Uganda.

The Alliance was established in 1995 as an independent non-governmental legal entity, registered as a company limited by guarantee.

Vision

Ugandan society where there is equitable access and control over land, and where the poor women, men and children are actively participating to eradicate poverty.

Mission

To enhance access, control, and ownership of land by the poor and marginalized women, men, and children through the promotion of fair laws and policies aimed at protecting their land rights.

Objectives

   1. Increased land rights awareness among poor women, men, children, and other marginalized groups
   2. Lobby and advocate for fair land laws and policies to protect and promote the land rights of poor women, men, children and other marginalized groups
   3. Effective participation of members in the Alliance’s programs, and enhanced collaboration with other organizations and institutions
   4. Efficiency and effectiveness in the planning and management of the Alliance’s programs

Uganda Land Alliance (ULA) Resources

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Manuals & Guidelines
July 2016
Uganda

Uganda discovered commercial quantities of oil in the country in 2006 and ever since, there has been increased activity in the exploration of oil and gas. The exploration activities are being undertaken in the Albertine Graben in mostly the districts of Hoima, Buliisa, and Nwoya by international oil companies contracted by the government. Currently, there are three licensed companies namely, Tullow Uganda operations Ltd , Total E&P and CNOOC Uganda Ltd operating in the districts of Hoima, Buliisa and Nwoya within the Albertine Graben.

Conference Papers & Reports
March 2016
Africa
Uganda

The 1995 Constitution of the Republic of Uganda is one of the most gender sensitive constitutions in the world, with clear provisions for promoting and protecting the rights of women. This is also the case in relation to women’s land rights – the Constitution clearly vests land in the people of Uganda, including the rights of women to own and inherit land. Other land laws, including the Land Act, recognize and uphold women’s rights to land as individuals, and as part of a family or community.

Reports & Research
October 2014
Africa
Uganda

The Land Governance Assessment Framework (LGAF) is a diagnostic tool for the evaluation of the legal framework, policies and practices regarding land and land use. The LGAF is based on a comprehensive review of available conceptual and empirical material regarding experience in land governance (refer to Land Governance Assessment Framework: Conceptual Approach, Formulation and Methodology). In 1995, the Uganda government embarked on land reform starting with the Constitutional provisions. Land reform was imperative because of the country’s turbulent land tenure history.

Reports & Research
September 2011
Uganda

This report is in relation to a study on the Land Tenure and Livelihood Issues in the Albertine Graben Region. The study was carried out in three districts of Amuru Buliisa and Hoima. The study specifically focused on tenurial arrangements and land transactions in the region. The ultimate outcome of this study will be drawing of policy issues for policy engagement and dialogue towards a comprehensive policy direction to land governance in the Albertine Graben.

Reports & Research
January 2011
Global

This book is the result of a recent field study conducted between May and July 2011 in Uganda by the Uganda Land Alliance.  The ULA’s documentation team embarked on field trips in 8 different country districts (Amuru, Apac, Gulu, Pader, Hoima, Kyenjojo, Mubende and Jinja) to establish the progress women have made vis a vis their rights to land and identified individuals who have made gains in ‘fighting’ for their land rights. These persons were asked to share their stories.

The detailed experiences captured from the cases have been published into the book

Journal Articles & Books
December 2010
Uganda

Property Rights and Gender: A Training Toolkit (contains 5 modules)