Pérou

Peru

Anglais

Peru’s almost 31 million inhabitants benefit from the country‘s exceptional biodiversity and abundance of natural resources. However, these are threatened by land degradation, deforestation, water pollution and weaknesses in the management of Peru‘s forests, minerals and water. Furthermore, although Peru‘s formal laws recognize the autonomy and rights of the country‘s indigenous and peasant communities, there are still land titling and disputes issues, and these groups have the highest rates of poverty in the country. In recent years, programs to develop cadastres1 and provide titles for rural and urban land resulted in roughly half the land being titled; this includes formalization of informal rights in urban and peri-urban areas. However, while women have received an increasing share of rights to agricultural land, they often participate very little in community governance decisions about land and other natural resources.

In spite of Peru‘s substantial water resources overall, the populated desert coast experiences chronic water shortages. Irrigation has been a determining factor in increasing food security, growth of agricultural productivity, and human development in rural areas of the country. 60 percent of Peru’s land mass (73.3 million hectares) is covered by forests. Deforestation, at a rate of 0.2 percent per year, is the primary source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the country (MINAM, 2011). Land conflicts are common in Peru, with the most visible arising from exploitation of minerals and timber. The formal system of dispute resolution is not considered accessible by most of the population, especially the rural poor.

GDP growth is rebounding after a regional downturn in 2014. World Bank Forecasts indicate this trend will continue. Nonetheless, problems with inequality persist. Nationwide, the rates of total and extreme poverty were 21,77 percent and 4,1 percent (2015 data according to the National Institute of Statistics and Informatics (Spanish acronym INEI). The rate of poverty in rural areas is almost triple the rate in urban areas (37,9 and 13,9, respectively), with the most extreme poverty found in remote rural areas among indigenous Peruvians.

Intercambiar conocimientos, perspectivas, experiencias y propuestas sobre género y derechos a la tierra en América Latina y el Caribe: un debate entre organizaciones claves en la región

Intercambiar conocimientos, perspectivas, experiencias y propuestas sobre género y derechos a la tierra en América Latina y el Caribe: un debate entre actores claves en la región

Jeudi, décembre 1, 2016 to Mercredi, février 15, 2017
Facilitators
Kemly Camacho
Isabel Rojas
Paola Brambilla

Desde el 1 de diciembre 2016 hasta el 15 de febrero 2017

Land Portal y Anacaonas (un proyecto de Sula Batsu Cooperativa de gestión del conocimiento sobre género en América Latina y el Caribe) están trabajando juntos para movilizar conocimientos alrededor de Género y derechos a la tierra en América Latina y el Caribe.

Open
Debate Propiedad colectiva

Propiedad colectiva en Sudamérica, desafíos y perspectivas

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Dimanche, octobre 23, 2016 to Vendredi, novembre 25, 2016
Facilitators
Alejandro Diez
gonzalocolque
Sergio Coronado
Juan Pablo Chumacero

De manera general, la mayoría de las tierras rurales en el mundo han estado en manos de comunidades campesinas locales y pueblos indígenas bajo sistemas consuetudinarios de tenencia de tierras; aunque históricamente la propiedad agraria en zonas rurales, con los recursos naturales contenidos en ella, ha sido motivo de tensión entre diversos actores con formas diferentes de comprender y asumir la propiedad. En esta pugna de intereses, normalmente las comunidades campesinas e indígenas con formas colectivas de propiedad, han salido perdiendo.

Closed

Collective property in South America, challenges and prospects

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Dimanche, octobre 23, 2016 to Vendredi, novembre 25, 2016
Facilitators
Alejandro Diez
gonzalocolque
Sergio Coronado
Juan Pablo Chumacero

Generally, most rural land in the world has been in the hands of local peasant communities and indigenous peoples under customary land tenure systems; historically although, land ownership in rural areas, and natural resources contained in it, have been a source of tension between different actors with different ways to understand and take ownership. In this conflict of interest, usually rural and indigenous communities with collective forms of property, have lost out.

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Sergio Perea, president of the Tres Islas community in Peru, presenting Brazil nuts. Photo credit: Juan Carlos Huayllapuma/CIFOR

What’s in a land title?

By the Center for International Forestry Research  Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) 

Peru - The indigenous community of Tres Islas in southeastern Peru seems to have it all—good fishing; a vast forest of timber, Brazil nut, palm and other trees; and natural beauty any ecotourist would pay to enjoy.

But the villagers have learned that having communal land rights does not guarantee the enjoyment of all these rights.

Gold mine chose 'eviction over dialogue' in Peru land dispute: report

By: Chris Arsenault
Date: September 29th 2016
Source: Thomson Reuters Foundation

RIO DE JANEIRO (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - One of the world's biggest gold mining firms has pledged to improve its dispute resolution practices following an 18-month investigation into a bitter, ongoing conflict over land between farmers and its Peruvian subsidiary.

Picking the Poor : Indicators for Geographic Targeting in Peru

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Geographic targeting is perhaps the most
popular mechanism used to direct social programs to the poor
in Latin America. The author empirically compares geographic
targeting indicators available in Peru. He combines
household-level information from the 1994 and 1997 Peru
Living Standards Measurement Surveys and district-level
information from the 1993 Peru Population and Housing
Census. He then conducts a series of simulations that

Resource information

août 2014
Publisher(s)
World Bank Group

Designing a Rural Development Strategy for Peru's Sierra

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Poverty and economic stagnation
characterize most rural areas in Peru. National growth has
been slow and uneven since the mid-1970s, benefiting urban
areas rather than rural ones. Between 1985 and 2000, the
number of poor people increased by 71 percent. The incidence
of poverty (67 percent) and extreme poverty (40 percent) is
highest in rural areas, reaching 73 percent (poverty) and 41
percent (extreme poverty) in the sierra. This means that 4.2

Resource information

août 2012
Publisher(s)
World Bank Group

Using Traditional Knowledge in Economic Development : The Impact of Raised Field Irrigation on Agricultural Production in Puno, Peru

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The Andean region of Puno, known as the
altiplano, is located at 3,830 meters above sea level. The
terrain is prone to flooding, and thus difficult to
cultivate. In order to deal with this situation, Andean
indigenous populations displaced huge amounts of soil in
order to create raised fields that were better adapted to
agricultural use. Raised fields resolved many of the
problems that affect agriculture at high altitude. The

Resource information

août 2012
Publisher(s)
World Bank Group