Land use planning

Date of publication
janvier 2013
Geographical focus
Date of publication
janvier 2003
Geographical focus

This paper describes some of the experiences of the Plan Foncier Rural (PFR) or Rural Land Plans and what they teach about the more general question of identifying and recording of these rights, including group rights.

Date of publication
janvier 2012
Geographical focus

Significant progress has been made over the past decade or so in the development of policy and legislation that support the recognition of customary rights to land, with important legal rulings in Tanzania, Uganda, Mozambique, South Sudan, and South Africa. At the same time, the strengthening of communities’ traditional rights to use resources has progressed through community forest reserves and community conservation areas. However, many commons remain highly vulnerable, with land being removed by governments for national parks and large tracts appropriated for commercial agricultural investment on a regular basis. In particular this is true of the rangelands, where external interest in land for agriculture, and in its resources for other commercial ventures such as tourism, has grown. Even the most progressive policies and legislation still fail to provide adequate protection to many rangeland users and, most commonly, to the poorest and least powerful. At the same time, customary institutions that would have provided adequate protection in the past have been weakened due to both internal and external influences. This is the situation faced by many members of the International Land Coalition (ILC) working with rural communities who are highly vulnerable to land and resource appropriation and loss. In an attempt to address this, in October 2010 ILC brought a group of its members together in Addis Ababa to develop a learning initiative that will explore this topic through 2011–2012.1 The aim of this initiative is to identify ways in which the security of customary land users over their common property resources (including land) can be strengthened. In particular, it will focus on multi-use landscapes or territories such as rangelands, where the vulnerability of land and resource users is particularly high. As a first step in the development of the learning initiative, this scoping paper explores past and present experiences of land and resource tenure in rangelands (predominantly in Africa, where the bulk of the rangelands are located). It discusses the limitations of many of the tools and systems used to date, and identifies alternatives that have potential for providing greater security of tenure to rangeland users in the future. The further exploration of these alternatives will be the task of those taking part in the learning initiative over the next year. This document is a Working Document, and feedback, input and suggestions are welcomed by the author.

Date of publication
janvier 2010
Geographical focus

This Concept paper is in reality “a comprehensive road map” towards the realization of a National Spatial Plan. Its preparation is related to the country’s policy framework, the Kenya Vision 2030 and the National Land Policy and goes further to define National Spatial Plan; summarize the challenges that have
arisen due to lack of this plan and the benefits expected from its implementation. The concept elaborates the scope, methodology and an estimated budget for its preparation.
The aim of the Concept Paper is to:
· Define the general concept of Spatial Planning and specifically, National Spatial Planning.
· Demonstrate the role, relevance and application of the Spatial Plan in addressing National challenges and its contribution towards realization of Vision 2030.
· Define the scope and outline the methodology to be applied in preparation of the National Spatial Plan.
· Indicate resources requirements for the preparation of the National Spatial Plan and their probable sources.
· Define the strategic areas to be addressed by the plan and the expected outputs of the planning process.
· Determine the outputs of the planning process.

Participation, consultation and consensus are the hallmark of Spatial Planning. In this regard, the Concept Paper invites all stakeholders to think critically and constructively over the matters raised herein with the aim of adding value to Kenya’s first National Spatial Plan.

Date of publication
janvier 2010
Geographical focus

The three day conference held between 16th to 18th June, 2010 at Kenya School of Monetary
Studies was organized by the Department of Physical Planning, which is under the Ministry of
Lands. The conference brought together participants from line Government ministries, State
corporations, civil society, Local Authorities, Regional Development Authorities, Research
Institutions, Development partners and the Universities. The main purpose of the National Conference was to launch the preparation of National Spatial Plan. During the conference, the Department presented the concept paper which provides the roadmap for preparation of NSP, which was ultimately adopted by the stakeholders. Presentations were made by both local and international resource persons, on NSP preparation and issues related to it. A team of planners from Malaysia shared with the stakeholders their experiences in the preparation and implementation of Malaysia National Physical Plan. Other presentations touching on environment, poverty, rangelands, agriculture, Vision 2030 were made. These provided invaluable insights towards preparation of NSP. Stakeholders shared their experiences, probed,

Date of publication
janvier 2011
Geographical focus

This paper presents a discussion of the communal tenure system in Olkiramatian, a group ranch in the southern rangelands of Kenya which has granted the residents the flexibility and choice to pursue diversification alternatives that demand open landscapes. The local governance system, on the other hand, has provided an institutional framework for apportioning land and resources to divergent economic practices, and for collectively overseeing and managing livelihoods activities.  In contrast to other Maasai areas where land is individually owned, people in Olkiramatian have the added benefit of engaging in “collective” land use activities, such as conservation and eco-tourism. At this community level, the residents jointly own and manage the land, which, they are also using to experiment on emerging economic opportunities.

Date of publication
janvier 2011
Geographical focus

Land plays a very important role for farmers, especially ethnic minority farmers - whose living resources mainly based in agriculture. During the implementation of Innovation since 1986, the development and implementation of land policies to match with the conditions of the market economy and the process of industrialization and modernization of the country is considered a breakthrough in Vietnam. In this context, many land policies have been issued, with separated or related provisions for ethnic minorities (Vuong Xuan Tinh, 2007). The policy was reflected in legal documents, such as Land laws, resolutions, decisions, decrees, circulars of the National Assembly, Government and Ministries related to land use.


This report will analyze the legal basis of land use planning related to ethnic minorities in Vietnam. The content of the report is a review of the national legal documents, and within certain range there will have examples of Central Highlands area serving for the activities of the Vietnam UN - REDD Programme.


Published by Forest Carbon Asia

Date of publication
janvier 2009
Geographical focus

This manual was supported by GIZ, SIDA and JICA in order to develop a joint approach for participatory land use planning (PLUP ) in Laos. A technichal working group with representatives of the responsible governmental entities (NAFRI, NAFES, DoF, NLMA) elaborated this manual. Numerous stakeholders have been consulted during the course representing government agencies, development programs projects and INGOs. The ocbjective of the manual was to document improved approaches and procedures that can be used for future participatory forest and agricultural land use planning (PLUP) at village and village cluster levels, and in a range of different situations in the Lao PDR.


Published by rightslink Laos

Date of publication
janvier 2011
Geographical focus

In the early 1990s, the Lao government launched a nationwide Land Use Planning and Land Allocation  programme in a bid t foster socio-economic development while protecting the environment. However, the programme has long been perceived as having negative impacts on rural livelihoods. A central criticism was that limited local participation results in unsustainable land use plans; consequently, the government introduced significant changes into the process to enhance participation. This paper examines the extent to which the evolution of Laos’ village land use planning has resulted in increased local participation and improved livelihoods. Local participation was assessed quantitatively in six study villages, in combination with more qualitative surveys on planning practices and influences on livelihoods and land uses. The analysis reveals that local participation increased only slightly from early planning initiatives until pilot implementation of the revised programme, known as Participatory Land Use Planning. It also shows that (participation in) planning had very limited influence on local land use patterns. Drawing on these findings, the paper explores ways to better translate plans into concrete actions and to effect tangible change in local practices.


Published by Elsevier Ltd.

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