FAO

Date of publication
janvier 2013
Geographical focus

For those who see agroecological approaches as necessary for achieving the food, health, and environmental targets of post 2015 agenda, agroecology is not only central to maintaining ecosystem integrity, but also to realizing food sovereignty of those involved in food production and consumption.

IATP's new report, Scaling up Agroecology: Toward the Realization of the Right to Food, begins from five principles of agroecology, presents examples of practices that could be used to implement that approach. We also developed a set of ecological as well as socioeconomic indicators of success, and mutually supportive national and international policies that would be needed for that approach to flourish.

In this report, we explore how sustainable intensification (which relies on GMOs and intensive use of technology and agrochemicals) is fundamentally different from an agroecological approach because of the latter’s roots in the political economical critique of modern agricultural systems and a holistic ecosystem analysis.

Governments, foundations, and civil society all seem to agree on the need to invest in small farmers, a recognition that they (rather than industrial agriculture) feed majority of the poor people, and that we need to explore the ways in which to support them. In the final agreement on the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization’s (FAO) Investment in Smallholder Agriculture (a year-long process that involved civil society and governments), governments seem to recognize both approaches, sustainable intensification and agroecological approaches, as possible ways forward. But this may be misplaced.

Proponents of sustainable intensification often say (when supporting the use of both organic and GM technologies) that “no single technology is a silver bullet.” However, as a science based approach to growing food, feed and fuel that is rooted in farmers, experiences, agroecology is closest thing we have when it comes to enhancing soil biotic activity and ensuring that the soil is in the best condition to respond to nutritional needs. Moreover, agroecology enables us to be climate resilient, reduce our fossil fuel dependency, and reduce the environmental—carbon, water and biodiversity—footprints of agriculture.

Even when they are convinced that agroecological approaches are the way forward, governments, funders and policy makers are challenged by the question of how to move forward. This report is an attempt to address these questions: it identifies a set of indicators to help assess whether the policy initiatives we undertake will indeed contribute to scaling up agroecology.

This document was prepared by IATP based on consultations with a number of partner organizations and individuals involved in advancing agroecology around the world, including Grassroots International, International Development Exchange, Focus on the Global South, More and Better, and Third World Network and was further refined on the basis of workshops and consultations with partners in Mexico, Brazil and South Africa in Fall 2013. We've shared it with allies, governments and international agencies during the recently concluded meeting of the Committee on World Food Security (CFS) in Rome.

- See more here.

 

 

Date of publication
janvier 2013
Geographical focus

Le Groupe d’experts de haut niveau (en anglais: High Level Panel of Experts/HLPE) sur la sécurité alimentaire et la nutrition a été étabili en 2010 en tant que interface science-politique du Comité sur la Sécurité Alimentaire Mondiale (CSA). Le HLPE vise à améliorer la robustesse de l'élaboration des politiques, en fournissant des analyses indépendantes fondées sur des preuves et des conseils à la demande du CSA.

Au jour d'hui le HLPE a lancé ses deux nouveax rapports:
#5Agrocarburants et sécurité alimentaire
#6 Paysans et entrepreneurs: investir dans l’agriculture des petits exploitants pour la sécurité alimentaire

Les deux rapports son disponibles sur le site internet.

Date of publication
janvier 2013
Geographical focus

The High Level Panel of Experts on Food Security and Nutrition (HLPE) was established in 2010 as the science-policy interface of the UN Committee on World Food Security (CFS). The HLPE aims to improve the robustness of policy making by providing independent, evidence-based analysis and advice at the request of CFS.

The HLPE launched today its two new reports:
#5 Biofuels and food security
#6 Investing in smallholder agriculture for food security

they are available on the website.

Date of publication
janvier 2013
Geographical focus

Ce bref rapport examine comment les gouvernements, les institutions financières internationales et les sociétés mondiales collaborent dans de nouveaux projets en Afrique (actuellement au Mozambique et en Tanzanie) pour réorganiser terres et des eaux et de créer une infrastructure industrielle sur des millions d'hectares dans le but d'assurer un approvisionnement soutenu de produits de base et des bénéfices pour les marchés. Le concept de corridors est apparue lors du Forum économique mondial, et plusieurs grandes entreprises sont impliquées. Les Corridors de croissance agricole en Afrique sont décrits comme des opportunités de développement, en particulier pour les petits agriculteurs, mais sont susceptibles d'être plus avantageux pour les entreprises et les gouvernements clients. Ils ont le soutien des institutions internationales, notamment le Forum économique mondial, les groupes des grandes économies mondiales du G8 et du G20, de l'Organisation de l'alimentation et de l'agriculture et de la Banque mondiale. Plus récemment, bon nombre des mêmes acteurs se sont réunis pour créer la nouvelle Alliance pour la sécurité alimentaire et la nutrition, qui promet de renforcer et d'étendre le concept de corridor.

Le rapport est divisé en trois parties, 1) Une introduction aux corridors et la Nouvelle Alliance et qui est derrière eux, 2) les corridors eux-mêmes, et 3) les impacts potentiels.

Date of publication
janvier 2013
Geographical focus

This brief report looks at how governments, international finance institutions and global corporations are collaborating in major new projects in Africa (currently in Mozambique and Tanzania) to reorder land and water use and create industrial infrastructure over millions of hectares in order to ensure sustained supplies of commodities and profits for markets. The Corridors concept first emerged at the World Economic Forum and a number of major corporations are involved. African Agricultural Growth Corridors are described as development opportunities, especially for small farmers, but are likely to be most advantageous to corporations and client governments. They have the backing of international institutions including the World Economic Forum, the G8 and G20 groups of the major global economies, the Food and Agriculture Organisation and the World Bank. More recently many of the same players have come together to create the New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition, which promises to reinforce and extend the Corridor concept.

The report is divided into three parts, 1) an introduction to the Corridors and the New Alliance and who is behind them, 2) the corridors themselves, and 3) the potential impacts.

Geographical focus

The VG exercise has been presented as a continuum from the ICARRD Conference and commitments by Member States; therefore there is scope for a comparative analysis of the two texts.

A detailed comparative analysis reveals that many aspects highlighted in ICARRD Final Declaration have been treated in the same spirit by the VG. In this sense it makes sense to consider VG as a continuation of the efforts of ICARRD. It is also noted that the VG focus on governance of tenure and as such have a different (more limited) scope from the ICARRD FD (that was pointing to both the access dimension as well as to the “development” – rural/territorial).

However, the analysis gives rise to some recommendations for stronger alignment of the present (zero) draft of the VGs with some positions taken by the Member States in the ICARRD FD. The attached document will give you more details.

S'abonner à RSS - FAO