Asie

Area code (UN M.49)
142

With secure land tenure, Indigenous Peoples and local communities can realize human rights, achieve economic growth, protect the environment, and maintain cultural integrity

Indigenous & Community Land Rights

For centuries, Indigenous Peoples and local communities (IPLCs) have used, managed and depended on collectively-held land for food supplies, cultural and spiritual traditions, and other livelihood needs. Historically governed through customary tenure systems rooted in community norms and practices that often go back centuries, governments often consider such community land as vacant, idle, or state-owned property.  Statutory recognition and protection of indigenous and community land rights continues to be a major challenge.

Date of publication
mars 2016
Geographical focus

Urbanisation in Asia and the Pacific: Challenges for Responsible Land Administration and Land Management

Date of publication
mars 2016
Geographical focus

Urbanisation in Asia and the Pacific: Challenges for Responsible Land Administration and Land Management

Date of publication
août 2016
Geographical focus

The Asia and Pacific region has witnessed a remarkable transition in the past 2 decades. From 1990 to 2012, more than 1 billion people in Asia and the Pacific were lifted out of extreme poverty. The region also witnessed rapid economic growth, which is expected to remain stable at a growth rate of about 5.7% for the next 2 years.

Despite these achievements, the region is a global hot spot for water insecurity. It remains home to 60% of the world’s population and half of the world’s poorest people. Water for agriculture continues to consume 80% of the region’s resources. A staggering 1.7 billion people lack access to basic sanitation, and with a predicted population of 5.2 billion by 2050 and hosting 22 megacities by 2030, the region’s finite water resources will be placed under enormous pressure. Recent estimates indicate up to 3.4 billion people could be living in water-stressed areas of Asia by 2050. 

Coupling demographics with changes in demand adds a further dimension. Industrialization and economic transformation require more power and a shift to more water-intensive diets, thus increasing competition between water users like industry and agriculture. The region’s water demand is projected to increase by about 55%, due to the growing needs for domestic water, manufacturing, and thermal electricity generation. Agriculture will need to produce 60% more food globally by 2050, and 100% more in developing countries, using diminishing water resources.

These challenges are compounded by increasing climate variability and water-related disasters that threaten numerous major urban areas, agricultural production, and coastal populations. Poor governance and weak institutional capacity endemic of almost all developing countries in Asia and the Pacific place sustained and inclusive economic development of the region into a very precarious situation.

Water remains pivotal for sustainable development and is linked to a number of global challenges. The advent of the post-2015 development agenda and a dedicated Sustainable Development Goal for water reflects this message and reemphasizes the interlinkages of this finite resource across a range of users.

Japan: Ministry plans to guide Asian nations in better use of land

On Tue, Aug 30, 2016

By: Jiji
Date: August 28th 2016
Source: Japan Times

The land ministry plans to draft a multilateral framework that could help developing nations in Asia make better use of their land through careful planning, government sources said.

The sources said the ministry will propose the framework at the U.N. Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development (Habitat III) in Quito, Ecuador, in October.

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