Burundi

ISO3
BDI
Synonyms
Burundi

Lay of the Land : Improving Land Governance to Stop Land Grabs

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Large-scale land acquisitions by investors, which are often called ‘land grabs’ (see next section for de nition), can deprive rural women and communities of their livelihoods and land, increasing their food insecurity. This report argues that the current rise in land grabbing needs to be urgently addressed, and focuses
on the actions that developing countries can take to mitigate land grabs through strengthening national land governance so that it is transparent, is accountable and protects communities’ rights.

Resource information

Octubre 2012
Publisher(s)
ActionAid

Post-conflict land governance reform in the African Great Lakes region. Part III - Securing tenure of smallholder peasants

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In post-conflict settings, securing tenure of local smallholders is considered of major importance to reduce and prevent local land disputes, to contribute to the recovery of rural livelihoods, and to improve agricultural production. Registration and other ways of formalizing land ownership are generally believed to significantly enhance local tenure security and rural development.

Resource information

Noviembre 2016
Publisher(s)
African Studies Centre Leiden
University of Leiden

Post-conflict land governance reform in the African Great Lakes region. Part II - Reshuffling land ownership for development

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After conflict, governments and donors often feel a need for up-scaling and modernizing land use. There is an ambition to achieve economic recovery and contribute to food security through stimulating large-scale investment in land. Our research in Uganda, Burundi and South Sudan suggests that policymakers should be extremely careful when promoting large-scale land acquisitions, both foreign and national. Especially in the difficult transition from war to peace, large-scale appropriation of land risks becoming a threat to tenure security and the recovery of rural livelihoods.

Resource information

Noviembre 2016
Publisher(s)
African Studies Centre Leiden
University of Leiden

Post-conflict land governance reform in the African Great Lakes region. Part I - The challenges of post-conflict land reform

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Disputes over land are a prominent feature of many situations of protracted violent conflict in Burundi, Uganda and South Sudan. Research conducted as part of the programme ‘Grounding Land Governance’ underscores that war reshuffles access and ownership, but also critically changes the ways in which land is governed. Land issues often come to resonate with other conflicts in society, thereby affecting overall stability. This makes interventions in land governance politically sensitive.

Resource information

Noviembre 2016
Publisher(s)
African Studies Centre Leiden
University of Leiden

Burundi

Inglés

Burundi‘s history of political conflict over the last 50 years has revolved in large measure around issues of access to land for agriculture. 91% of the total land is classified as agricultural land and the majority of Burundi’s population (90%) lives in rural areas.

According to the Post-Transition Interim Constitution, every Burundian has the right to property, but more specific laws related to land do not support this constitutional right. In addition, while under the customary system land is held by individual heads of households, the 1986 Land Code requires that land held customarily needs to be registered in order to be officially recognized. The Land Code has been strongly criticized and its revision is still in process.

Land in Burundi represents one of the underlying reasons for conflicts, particularly when land is related to specific ethnic groups and to the displacement and return of people during the civil war. Other common causes of disputes are: competing claims of inheritance (including by orphans); expropriation of land; polygamous marriages; and fraudulent land transactions.

Preventing Conflict through Improved Policies on Land Tenure, Natural Resource Rights, and Migration in the Great Lakes Region

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Since the early 1990s, parts of Afri-ca’s Great Lakes Region have expe-rienced political strife, armed con-flict and population displacements withsevere humanitarian consequences. De-spite great progress towards sustainablepeace in all the countries of the region,sporadic violence continues in some ar-eas, particularly in the Eastern DemocraticRepublic of Congo (DRC). Conflicts in theGreat Lakes Region are highly interlinked,with political and military alliances, refu-gee movements, and ethnic solidarities ty-ing the fates of the countries of the re-gion.

Resource information

Marzo 2004
Publisher(s)
African Centre for Technology Studies

Conflict in the Great Lakes Region - how is it linked with land and migration

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Africa’s Great Lakes Region has in recent years experienced
political strife, armed conflict and population displacements
with severe humanitarian consequences. While these events
have clearly revolved around political struggles for the control
of the state, recent research has pointed to the significance
of access to renewable natural resources as structural causes
and sustaining factors in struggles for power in the region.
Contested rights to land and natural resources are significant,

Resource information

Marzo 2005
Publisher(s)
Overseas Development Institute
African Centre for Technology Studies

Land Policy in Africa: Central Africa Regional Assessment

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 The Central African region includes Angola, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Sao Tome & Principe. The region is characterized by its high diversity, as it reflects all types of ecosystems of the continent. The region is most known as hosting one of the world’s richest forest biodiversity as well as valuable natural resources such as mineral resources and oil. The population of Central African region was estimated at some 121 000 000 inhabitants in 2007. However this population is unevenly distributed.

Resource information

Septiembre 2012
Publisher(s)
Land Policy Initiative