Reports & Research
Enero 2011

This Project Information Note (PIN) outlines an initial application to the Plan Vivo Foundation for working with select pastoralist and hunter-gatherer communities in Mongo wa Mono village, Mbulu District, Northern Tanzania (34°30’/03°30’S).

Journal Articles & Books
Enero 2009

This study looks at the impact of subdivision and sedentarization of pastoral lands on wildlife numbers and production in a savanna ecosystem of southern Kenya. The study uses aerial counts over a period of 33 years to compare changes in wildlife populations on two adjacent and ecologically similar Maasai group ranches. During the period under study, one group ranch was subdivided and settled. The other remained communally owned under shifting seasonal use.

Reports & Research
Enero 2011

This paper presents a discussion of the communal tenure system in Olkiramatian, a group ranch in the southern rangelands of Kenya which has granted the residents the flexibility and choice to pursue diversification alternatives that demand open landscapes.

Reports & Research
Enero 2007

Conservation enterprises are commercial activities designed to create benefit flows that support a conservation objective. The Koija ‘Starbeds’ Ecolodge was created jointly by a community group, a private sector partner and the African Wildlife Foundation (AWF) to help protect a critical wildlife corridor and habitat along the Ewaso Nyiro River in the Samburu Heartland (www.awf.org). Many conservation enterprises claim success mainly based on their noble intentions,

Journal Articles & Books
Enero 2006

Between 1999 and 2002, interviews were conducted in Laikipia District to examine whether pastoralists also experience conflict, and to determine whether wildlife conservation provided appreciable benefits to residents, or fostered pro-conservation attitudes

Policy Papers & Briefs
Enero 2008

The Kenyan Dry land Livestock and Wildlife Environment Interface Project (DLWEIP), An African Union Inter-African Bureau for Animal Resources (AU-IBAR) and African Wildlife Foundation (AWF) have developed a Community Scout Based Natural Resources Monitoring Programme for Naibung’a Conservancy of Laikipia District in February 2007. A wildlife and habitat monitoring programme was established at four group ranches in Naibung’a conservancy including Tiamamut, Kijabe, Koija and Nkiloriti.

Policy Papers & Briefs
Enero 2008

In most areas within the livestock wildlife environment interface, nomadism by pastoralists is gradually being replaced by sedentarism and migration corridors are closed by settlements from the ever-increasing human population. Faced by a reducing pasture resource and yet slow to adopt de-stocking, pastoralists have now embraced the practical and novel ‘Conservancy’ concept in order to earn from tourism and subsidise income from livestock. However, sustaining wildlife on pasture land is a challenge that has now found a solution in the form of conservancy zonation schemes.

Reports & Research
Enero 2011

IUCN’s work in Garba Tula (GT) through this project has now been underway for almost two years, and to date a number of activities have been implemented in the area. This has included: sensitization and awareness raising of local community members; providing support to help strengthen the operations of the Resource Advocacy Programme (RAP – a local NGO working in the Garba Tula area); and supporting work carried out by RAP members to document traditional institutions and strategies for governing natural resources in the Garba Tula area.

Reports & Research
Enero 2011

Conservation business is booming in East Africa, but is threatened by major long term wildlife declines. Pastoralist rangelands are among the highest-earning and fastest-growing tourism destinations, but their populations have mean incomes and development indices consistently below national averages. Governments and conservation organisations see green development, often through community-based conservation (CBC), as building sustainable livelihoods and biodiversity conservation in EA rangelands.

Reports & Research
Enero 2011

This report provides an overview of land use conflicts in Loliondo. According to the Village Land Act No. 5 1999, all land in Loliondo is classified as Village Land. However, there is spatial overlap of Village Lands and a Game Controlled Areas. Prior to 2009 GCAs had not bearing on land use or management; however the 2009 Wildlife Conservation Act prohibits farming and livestock grazing in GCA. This new Act poses a huge problem to pastoral commuinities. An economic summary provides a better understanding of initial revenue that could be generated from Loliondo.