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Geographical focus
12 June 2017
Global
India

NEW DELHI, Jun 12 2017 (IPS) - In Meghalaya, India’s northeastern biodiversity hotspot, all three major tribes are matrilineal. Children take the mother’s family name, while daughters inherit the family lands.

Because women own land and have always decided what is grown on it and what is conserved, the state not only has a strong climate-resistant food system but also some of the rarest edible and medicinal plants, researchers said.

2 June 2017
Global
Brazil

On 31 May 2017, The Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization (UNPO) thanks to the support of the Nando Peretti Foundation and along with fellow hosts Mr Xabier Benito Ziluaga MEP (GUE/NGL), Mr Urmas Paet MEP (ALDE), Mr Francisco Assis MEP (S&D), Mr Ignazio Corrao MEP (EFDD), Pier Antonio Panzeri MEP (S&D) and Mr Pascal Durand MEP (Greens/EFA) organised a conference entitled “The Guarani-Kaiowá and the Assault on Indigenous Rights in Brazil” at the European Parliament in Brussels.

4 June 2017
Nigeria

Worried by the high rate of deforestation in the state and its negative consequences, some communities in Cross River State have called for the adoption of forest governance as a way to tackle the menace.

29 May 2017
Africa
Kenya
Uganda
Cameroon
Namibia

With detailed field studies from Kenya, Cameroon, Uganda and Namibia, a new report sheds light on the consequences of extractive industries on land rights and indigenous peoples in Africa. “Worrying that so little is done to protect the environment and the indigenous peoples,” says the report.
 

Environmental degradation, cultural ethnocide and gross human rights violations: For indigenous peoples these are some of the consequences of the current global race for natural resources and raw materials.

5 June 2017
Brazil

SAO PAULO, Brazil – On May 29 the NGO SOS Mata Atlântica and the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais released their annual report on the Atlantic Forest with some worrying results. The report shows that between 2015 and 2016, more than 29,000 hectares (71,660 acres) of native forests were lost. That’s a 57.7 percent increase over the previous year.